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Issue 67, October 2008
Contents


Editorial    Summary of Editorial column
 Italy and France: the Eternal Challenge
There is a news going on in these days: Italy will surpass France and it will become the first country in the world for the production of wine. It is the eternal and renewed competition between two countries which are never tired of… [more]



Wine Tasting    Summary of Wine Tasting column
 Comparing Dolcetto
The three Dolcetto wines of our comparative tasting
Among the most famous grapes of Piedmont, Dolcetto produces wines with interesting organoleptic qualities, a pleasing wine where fruit aromas are protagonists… [more]
 Wines of the Month
Taurasi Riserva Centotrenta 1999, Mastroberardino (Campania, Italy)
sto.jpg, Taurasi Riserva Centotrenta 1999, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Riserva Salarco 2004, Rosso Conero Riserva Passo del Lupo 2005, Champagne Deutz Brut Millesimée 2002, Avvoltore 2006, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Gersemi 2005… [more]


Events    Summary of Events column
 News



 Aquavitae
Grappa di Dolcetto, Casa Luparia (Piedmont, Italy)
Review of Grappa, Distillates and Brandy, Grappa Historia 90 Anni Edizione 2008, Grappa di Dolcetto, Grappa Nobile Stravecchia, Grappa di Verdicchio Anniversario… [more]
 Wine Parade



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  Editorial Issue 67, October 2008   
Italy and France: the Eternal ChallengeItaly and France: the Eternal Challenge  Contents 
Issue 66, September 2008 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 68, November 2008

Italy and France: the Eternal Challenge


 There is a news going on in these days: Italy will surpass France and it will become the first country in the world for the production of wine. It is the eternal and renewed competition between two countries which are never tired of seeking opportunities in order to challenge each other in many ways. It is likely, with the harvesting of 2008, Italy will surpass France in facts of wine production: after many years of undisputed leading of France, this year Italy will produce more grapes - and therefore more wine - than their transalpine cousins, therefore becoming the first country in the world in terms of quantity. Right, quantity. What about quality? You can even make an ocean of wine and se the record of opulence, but what is so much wine for when most of it is pretty disappointing in terms of quality? Let's make things clear: the quality of Italian wine is undeniable, high, very high quality, it has nothing less than the wines of France or the wines of other countries.


 

 The same can certainly be said for the wines of France, after all, the concep of quality in wine making - it would be silly to deny this - was created in this country, later adopted everywhere in the world. And not all of the French wine is of excellent quality, and the same can be said for the wines of every country, including Italy. There is no doubt about the fact it is nice to know Italy will be successful in being distinguished in the world - and at least this time for a good reason - however we should also ask ourselves of this grape tha will set this record, how much of it will be used for the production of a wine worth of this name, how much grape will be destined to the production of wines, in the best of the cases, defined as ordinary? There are different kind of markets, every consumer has its own needs and not all look for quality in a wine, mainly because it is usually offered at very high prices and not all can afford paying so much money. Most of the times, the solution is to be content with mediocre wine, however decent and sold at a modest price. This too is market, undoubtedly.

 Let's discuss the news. According to the estimates of French Ministry of Agriculture, in 2008 in France will be harvested less grapes than the average of the last five years, a drop of more than 10%, a harvesting which is announced to be the least profitable one since 2000. This drop in harvesting is supposed to bring to a production of about 46 millions of hectoliters of wine, a quantity to be likely lesser than the one foreseen in Italy. According to Coldiretti - the Italian association for agricultural development and support - in 2008 the harvesting in Italy will increase from 5 to 10%, an estimate which would bring the production to more than 46 millions of hectoliters, therefore greater than France. According to these estimates, the historical surpass is likely to take place and will bring Italy to be the first wine producing country of the world in terms of quantity. This result, undoubtedly, is also the consequence of the different meteorological conditions in the two countries in the course of the year.

 In Italy there was an alternation of sun and moderate rains in most of the territory, whereas the meteorological conditions of France have been worse, strongly influencing harvesting, as to be defined the worse since 2000. This productive record is added to the other results obtained by Italy in agricultural and food areas. Italy is in fact the first European country in fac of production of rice, tobacco, fresh fruits and vegetables, in biological and quality productions designated as Indicazione di Origine Protetta (Protected Geographical Indication). How the grapes of Italian vineyards will be used? About 60% of the grapes will be destined to the production of Denominazione d'Origine Controllata e Garantita wines (DOCG, Denomination of Controlled and Guaranteed Origin), Denominazione d'Origine Controllata (DOC, Denomination of Controlled Origin) and Indicazione Geografica Tipica (IGT, Typical Geographical Indication), whereas the remaining 40% will be used for the production of generic table wines. An estimate like that should make anyone think about an increasing in terms of quality: it is not the case to start a controversy about the real quality of many wines having the DOCG, DOC and IGT acronyms in their labels.

 How will it be the Italian wine of 2008 vintage? According to the estimates of Assoenologi - the Italian association of wine makers - the quality of wine will be very good, some of them will also reach excellence, something which is mostly expected for the wines of the South. It will be the South of Italy to set the highest productive records, whereas in the regions of the North it is likely to see some drops - about 10% in Lombardy and 5% in Piedmont - however obtaining an overall stable production in regard to 2007. In the South will be distinguished Sicily, with an increase of 55%, Apulia and Campania with 10%, whereas in the central area will be Marches to lead the production with an increase of 25%, followed by Abruzzo with 15% and Latium with 10%. According to Assoenologi, 2008 will give wines of very good quality, in particular white and sparkling wines in the North, whereas for red wines it is necessary to wai for the meteorological conditions in September in order to say something meaningful. We will have good red wines in case we will have sunny days with scarce rains, with good thermal excursions in the night.

 Estimates, predictions and, of course, nothing certain: only facts will tell whether these estimates will become reality or not. In case will happen the so expected and historical event of Italy surpassing France, this too must be confirmed by facts. As well as for the quality of 2008 vintage - including all the other ones - must be confirmed by facts by passing on a glass. Estimates and predictions can be amazing and exciting, as long as they don't become a disappointment. Whether Italy will surpass France or not, it will not be so important, at least not for wine lovers who always expect quality in their glasses, while having no interest about quantity. Moreover, in an increasing atmosphere of contrast which never brings anything good and which is frequently based on reasons of silly and exaggerated attachments to the culture and traditions of one's country, would not it be the time to go beyond this truly narrow vision? Hopefully passing for a good wine, where Italians and the French raise their glasses and make a friendly toast to the quality of their respective and excellent wines.

 




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  Wine Tasting Issue 67, October 2008   
Comparing DolcettoComparing Dolcetto Wines of the MonthWines of the Month  Contents 
Issue 66, September 2008 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 68, November 2008

Comparing Dolcetto

Among the most famous grapes of Piedmont, Dolcetto produces wines with interesting organoleptic qualities, a pleasing wine where fruit aromas are protagonists

 In these times where everyone is more or less looking for strong wines, robus and with the typical structure given by wood as to make them important, wines like Dolcetto are having some difficulties in the now vast wine scene. With its typical organoleptic qualities directly recalling fruits and flowers, Dolcetto is a wine which can be defined as a rarity. Nevertheless, in past times in Piedmont - its homeland - they used to drink Barbera wines everyday, whereas in holidays they usually uncorked bottles of Dolcetto. In other words, Dolcetto was the wine of the holidays, considered as a special wine for special occasions. The interest for Dolcetto is not so high today and this is could also be because of its name, as it could recall a wine with a basically sweet taste (Dolcetto means slightly sweet in Italian) and this is something absolutely false.

 Its name can in fact be associated to a style of wine instead of a grape. For this is reason, we should remember, first of all, Dolcetto is a grape and in Piedmont exist eleven DOC areas in which Dolcetto is used for the production of mono varietal wines, as well as two DOCG wines. Dolcetto is also found in Liguria, where it is known as Ormeasco, and also in this region is used for the production of DOC wines. In Piedmont is mainly cultivated in the provinces of Cuneo, Asti and Alessandria, whereas in Liguria is mainly cultivated in the province of Imperia. In Piedmont there are eleven Denominazione d'Origine Controllata wines (DOC, Denomination of Controlled Origin) about Dolcetto: Dolcetto d'Alba, Dolcetto di Dogliani, Dolcetto di Diano d'Alba, Dolcetto delle Langhe Monregalesi, Dolcetto d'Asti, Dolcetto d'Acqui, Dolcetto d'Ovada - representing the seven “historical” DOC areas - Langhe Dolcetto, Monferrato Dolcetto, Colli Tortonesi Dolcetto and Pinerolese Dolcetto. Moreover, there are two Denominazione d'Origine Controllata e Garantita wines (DOCG, Denomination of Controlled and Guaranteed Origin): Dolcetto di Dogliani Superiore - or, in short, Dogliani - designated in 2005, and Dolcetto di Ovada Superiore - or, in short, Ovada - designated in 2008.

 

Wines of the Tasting

 The origins of Dolcetto are not clear. Some believe it is a grape from Piedmont, others believe it is from Liguria - where it is known as Ormeasco - and introduced in Piedmont in medieval times as a result of commercial trading. The name has its origins from its evident sweetness, however Dolcetto is mainly used for the production of dry wines. The area in which Dolcetto gives its best is Dogliani, where was found a document dated back to 1593 in which the grape is mentioned. From the eighteenth century on Dolcetto is mentioned in many documents, whereas its spreading will begin after the 1850s. Dolcetto is an early ripening grape and harvesting is usually done around the half of September. Cultivation is mainly done in limestone and marly soils, in hilly areas from 250 and 600 meters above sea level (820-1970 feet), although it can also ripe well at altitudes higher than 700 meters (2300 feet).


The three Dolcetto wines of
our comparative tasting
The three Dolcetto wines of our comparative tasting

 Dolcetto is usually vinified in inert containers, very rarely in cask or barrique. The choice of inert containers allows in fact to exalt the typical fresh qualities of flowers and fruits of Dolcetto. In our comparative tasting we will examine two Dolcetto wines vinified in inert containers, although coming from different areas, and a Dolcetto aged in barrique. The first wine of the tasting is Seghesio's Dolcetto d'Alba Vigneto della Chiesa, aged for 9 months in steel tanks. The second wine is Pecchenino's Dolcetto di Dogliani Siri d'Jermu, aged for 6 months in steel tanks. The last wine of the tasting is Enzo Boglietti's Dolcetto d'Alba Tiglineri, the only wine of the three to be aged in wood for 8 months in barrique. The wines will be served at the temperature of 18° C (64° F) and for the sensorial analysis will be used, as usual, three ISO tasting glasses.

 

Appearance Analysis

 Thanks to its content in polyphenols and coloring substances, wines produced with Dolcetto are characterized by pretty intense and deep colors, with pretty low transparency. Because of the traditional custom of considering Dolcetto as an immediate and crisp wine, therefore favoring its consumption in youth, the most typical color observed in these wines is ruby red, intense and brilliant, with nuances of intense purple red, as well as ruby red. Some historical producers, convinced of the potentials of this grape, keep in their cellars Dolcetto wines aged for some years - therefore proving this grape can proficiently develop with time - and in which the ruby red color can be observed in the nuance as well.

 Let's begin the appearance analysis phase from Seghesio's Dolcetto d'Alba Vigneto della Chiesa. The color of this first wine - which can be observed a the base of the glass while holding it in a tilted position, where the liquid mass is thicker - is intense ruby red, whereas nuances, observed towards the opening of the glass, where the thickness of wine is lower, shows an eviden purple red color. Also the color of the second wine - Pecchenino's Dolcetto di Dogliani Siri d'Jermu - shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of purple red, typical in Dolcetto. It should be noticed the low transparency in both wines. The aspect of the third wine, Enzo Boglietti's Dolcetto d'Alba Tiglineri, is not different from the previous two wines. The color of this wine is intense and deep ruby red, deeper than previous wines, and nuances is confirmed as purple red. Also the transparency of this wine is evidently low.

 

Olfactory Analysis

 Fruits and flowers. This is how could be described the world of Dolcetto, both for the techniques used for its production - mainly inert containers such as steel tanks and cement - as well as for the fact these wines are consumed within two or three years from harvesting. Among the most typical olfactory qualities in Dolcetto are mentioned cherry and violet, as well as an aroma which is rarely found in red wines: almond. This particular aroma is frequently found in wines produced with Dolcetto, a quality which is frequently found in its basically bitter flavors recalling almond. In young Dolcetto wines can sometimes be found a peach aroma, a quality typical in many white wine. Among the mos representative flower aromas in Dolcetto, besides violet, are mentioned rose and cyclamen. Among fruits are found plum, blackberry, strawberry, raspberry and blueberry.


 

 Let's begin the discovery of Dolcetto's aromas from the first wine of the comparative tasting: Seghesio's Dolcetto d'Alba Vigneto della Chiesa. While keeping the glass in vertical position and without swirling, we will begin the evaluation of opening aromas, that is the olfactory sensations that mainly identify the wine, made of aromatic substances which volatilize with a small quantity of oxygen. The first smell will allow the appreciation of intense and clean aromas of cherry, plum and blueberry, typical opening sensations in Dolcetto. After having swirled the glass, we will proceed with a second smell in order to complete the aromatic profile of wine. From the glass will be perceived aromas of violet - the most characteristic flower aromas in Dolcetto - raspberry, blackberry, cyclamen, almond and hints of carob. It should be noticed, in particular, the aroma of almond, a frequent quality in Dolcetto.

 Let's now pass to the second wine - Pecchenino's Dolcetto di Dogliani Siri d'Jermu - which, like the previous wine, ages in steel tanks. The opening of this second Dolcetto is characterized by intense and clean aromas of cherry, blueberry and blackberry, also in this case pretty typical in Dolcetto. After having swirled the glass, the olfactory profile will be completed with aromas of raspberry, plum, strawberry, cyclamen, violet, black currant and a pleasing hin of menthol. It should also be noticed the aromas of peach and the usual almond. The opening of Enzo Boglietti's Dolcetto d'Alba Tiglineri - the only of the three to be aged in barrique for 8 months - is characterized by pleasing aromas of cherry, plum and blackberry. After having swirled the glass, in order to favor the development of other aromas, we will proceed with the second smell which will complete the aromatic profile of the wine with violet, blueberry, raspberry, peach and almond as well as aromas of vanilla and eucalyptus, the mark of the aging in barrique.

 

Gustatory Analysis

 Despite its fame of easy and immediate wine, Dolcetto offers good surprises to the palate as well. Among the most evident gustatory qualities of Dolcetto, there certainly is freshness given by the flavors of fruits, in particular black cherry and blackberry. Also in the finish is usually found a quality typical in white wines: after having swallowed a Dolcetto wine, most of the times the flavor perceived in the mouth recalls almond. Dolcetto is a grape with a moderate acidity, therefore its wines can be pleasingly round, thanks to the quantity of tannins which is never excessive or imposing. Nevertheless in the attack the contribution of tannins can be well evident, even though in most of cases, astringency is never so strong. Besides its moderate acidity, in Dolcetto wines aged in inert containers can be perceived a pleasing crispness, well matched to the fruit character of this wine.

 Let's begin the gustatory analysis of our wines from Seghesio's Dolcetto d'Alba Vigneto della Chiesa. The attack of this Dolcetto is moderately tannic in which can be appreciated the fresh nature of fruit flavors, in particular cherry, plum and blueberry. The wine is well balanced thanks to the contribution of alcohol with an evident pleasing character. Let's now pass to the second wine of our comparative tasting: Pecchenino's Dolcetto di Dogliani Siri d'Jermu. The attack of this Dolcetto is more tannic and astringent than the previous wine, although having a typical fresh fruity nature of cherry, blueberry and blackberry. Also in this case can be noticed the good balance of wine and the pleasing sensation of freshness which can be perceived in the mouth. Also the attack of the third wine - Enzo Boglietti's Dolcetto d'Alba Tiglineri - is pretty tannic, although in this case will be noticed a stronger roundness and structure given by the aging in barrique. Despite the evident contribution of wood, also in this wine will be perceived the characteristic fruit nature of cherry, blueberry and blackberry.

 

Final Considerations

 Despite Dolcetto is associated to its typical image of immediate and fresh wine, rich of fruit sensations, this grape is capable of making interesting wines going beyond immediateness. The finish of Seghesio's Dolcetto d'Alba Vigneto della Chiesa is persistent, leaving in the mouth pleasing and clean flavors of cherry, blueberry and plum. The finish of the second wine - Pecchenino's Dolcetto di Dogliani Siri d'Jermu - is persistent, leaving in the mouth, jus like the previous wine, intense and clean flavors of cherry, blueberry and plum, a typical finish of Dolcetto. Also the finish of the third wine of our comparative tasting, Enzo Boglietti's Dolcetto d'Alba Tiglineri, is persistent, leaving in the mouth intense and clean flavors of cherry, blueberry, plum and raspberry, with a sensation of structure and roundness more evident than the two previous wines. Finally, it should be noticed the contribution of wood in Dolcetto, by comparing the third wine with the two previous wines.

 






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  Wine Tasting Issue 67, October 2008   
Comparing DolcettoComparing Dolcetto Wines of the MonthWines of the Month  Contents 
Issue 66, September 2008 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 68, November 2008

Wines of the Month


 

Score legend

Fair    Pretty Good    Good
Very Good    Excellent
Wine that excels in its category Wine that excels in its category
Good value wine Good value wine
Prices are to be considered as indicative. Prices may vary according to the country
or the shop where wines are bought




Pizzo dei Corvi 2007, Pianadeicieli (Sicily, Italy)
Pizzo dei Corvi 2007
Pianadeicieli (Sicily, Italy)
Grapes: Chardonnay
Price: € 9.00 Score:
Pizzo dei Corvi shows an intense golden yellow color and nuances of golden yellow, very transparent. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas which start with hints of banana, quince and citrus fruits followed by aromas of pineapple, candied fruits, hawthorn, plum, honey, broom and hints of vanilla. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a crisp attack and pleasing roundness, however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, agreeable. The finish is persistent with flavors of banana, honey and citrus fruits. A small part of Pizzo dei Corvi ages in barrique.
Food Match: Pasta with fish and mushrooms, Roasted white meat, Roasted fish



Syrah 2006, Pianadeicieli (Sicily, Italy)
Syrah 2006
Pianadeicieli (Sicily, Italy)
Grapes: Syrah
Price: € 8.00 Score:   Good value wine
This Syrah shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, little transparency. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas that start with hints of black cherry, plum and black currant followed by aromas of blueberry, violet, vanilla, tobacco, black pepper, cinnamon, cocoa and menthol. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry, plum and black currant. A part of this Syrah ages in barrique.
Food Match: Broiled meat and barbecue, Roasted meat, Braised and stewed meat, Hard cheese



Gocce Preziose Merlot 2006, Vendrame (Latium, Italy)
Gocce Preziose Merlot 2006
Vendrame (Latium, Italy)
Grapes: Merlot
Price: € 5.00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
Gocce Preziose Merlot shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of garne red, little transparency. The nose denotes intense, clean and pleasing aromas that start with hints of plum and black cherry followed by aromas of vanilla, carob and menthol. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack and pleasing roundness, however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors. The finish is pretty persistent with flavors of plum and black cherry. Gocce Preziose Merlot ages for 12 months in barrique followed by at least 4 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Stuffed pasta, Sauteed meat, Stewed meat



Nettare di Circe 2006, Vendrame (Latium, Italy)
Nettare di Circe 2006
Vendrame (Latium, Italy)
Grapes: Muscat Blanc
Price: € 7.40 - 375ml Score:
Nettare di Circe shows a pale amber yellow color and nuances of golden yellow, transparent. The nose reveals intense, clean and pleasing aromas which start with hints of raisin, candied fruits and citrus fruit peel followed by aromas of dried fig, peach jam and vanilla. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a sweet and round attack, however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors. The finish is persistent with flavors of raisin, dried fig and candied fruits. Nettare di Circe ages for 12 months in small oak barrels followed by at least 4 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Confectionery



Rosso Conero Riserva Passo del Lupo 2005, Fazi Battaglia (Marches, Italy)
Rosso Conero Riserva Passo del Lupo 2005
Fazi Battaglia (Marches, Italy)
Grapes: Montepulciano (85%), Sangiovese (15%)
Price: € 18.00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
Rosso Conero Riserva Passo del Lupo shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, little transparency. The nose denotes intense, clean, pleasing, refined and elegant aromas which start with hints of plum, black cherry and blackberry followed by aromas of violet, blueberry, vanilla, tobacco, pink pepper, cinnamon, chocolate and menthol. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, full body, intense flavors, agreeable. The finish is persisten with flavors of black cherry, plum and blackberry. A well made wine. Rosso Conero Riserva Passo del Lupo ages for 24 months in barrique followed by about 10 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Game, Roasted meat, Braised and stewed meat, Hard cheese



Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Riserva San Sisto 2005, sto.jpg
Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Riserva San Sisto 2005
sto.jpg
Grapes: Verdicchio
Price: € 18.00 Score:
Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Riserva San Sisto shows a brilliant golden yellow color and nuances of straw yellow, very transparent. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing, refined and elegan aromas that start with hints of apple, vanilla and almond followed by aromas of peach, plum, hazelnut, hawthorn, pear, honey, butter, citrus fruits, pineapple and mineral. The mouth has excellent correspondence to the nose, a crisp attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is very persistent with long flavors of apple, plum, almond and pineapple. A well made wine. Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Riserva San Sisto ages for 12 months in barrique followed by at least 12 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Fish soups, Pasta with fish, Roasted fish, Roasted white meat



Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Gersemi 2005, Fassati (Tuscany, Italy)
Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Gersemi 2005
Fassati (Tuscany, Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese (90%), Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon (10%)
Price: € 18.00 Score:
Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Gersemi shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, little transparency. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas which start with hints of plum, black cherry and violet followed by aromas of raspberry, vanilla, tobacco, blueberry, chocolate, mace and menthol. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, full body, intense flavors. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry, plum and blueberry. Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Gersemi ages for 24 months in barrique, 12 months in cask and for 10 months in bottle.
Food Match: Game, Roasted meat, Braised and stewed meat with mushrooms, Hard cheese



Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Riserva Salarco 2004, Fassati (Tuscany, Italy)
Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Riserva Salarco 2004
Fassati (Tuscany, Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese (95%), Mammolo, Colorino (5%)
Price: € 24.00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Riserva Salarco shows a brilliant ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, moderate transparency. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing, refined and elegant aromas which start with hints of plum, black cherry and violet followed by aromas of vanilla, blackberry, blueberry, cocoa, cinnamon, mace, tobacco and menthol. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, full body, intense flavors, agreeable. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry, plum and blackberry. A well made wine. Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Riserva Salarco ages for 24 months in barrique followed by at least 10 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Game, Roasted meat, Braised and stewed meat with mushrooms, Hard cheese



Champagne Deutz Brut Millesimée 2002, Deutz (Champagne, France)
Champagne Deutz Brut Millesimée 2002
Deutz (Champagne, France)
Grapes: Pinot Noir (60%), Chardonnay (30%), Pinot Meunier (10%)
Price: € 55.00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
Champagne Deutz Brut Millesimée shows brilliant straw yellow color and nuances of straw yellow, fine and persistent perlage, very transparent. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing, refined and elegant aromas which start with hints of banana, hazelnut and bread crust followed by aromas of yeast, pear, apple, mineral, hawthorn, croissant, marzipan, raspberry, butter and praline. The mouth has excellent correspondence to the nose, an effervescent and crisp attack, however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, agreeable. The finish is persistent with flavors of banana, raspberry, apple and hazelnut. A well made wine.
Food Match: Pasta and risotto with fish, Stewed white meat, Stewed fish



Taurasi Riserva Centotrenta 1999, Mastroberardino (Campania, Italy)
Taurasi Riserva Centotrenta 1999
Mastroberardino (Campania, Italy)
Grapes: Aglianico
Price: € 30.00 Score:
Taurasi Riserva Centotrenta shows a brilliant ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, moderate transparency. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing, refined and elegant aromas which start with hints of plum, blackberry and black cherry followed by aromas of dried violet, blueberry, tobacco, vanilla, leather, cocoa, mace, licorice and menthol. The mouth has excellent correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, full body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is very persistent with long flavors of black cherry, blackberry and plum. A well made wine. Taurasi Riserva Centotrenta ages for about 30 months in cask and barrique followed by at least 18 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Game, Roasted meat, Braised and stewed meat, Hard cheese



Monteregio di Massa Marittima 2005, Moris Farms (Tuscany, Italy)
Monteregio di Massa Marittima 2005
Moris Farms (Tuscany, Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese (90%), Cabernet Sauvignon (10%)
Price: € 12.00 Score:
Monteregio di Massa Marittima shows a brilliant ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, moderate transparency. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas that start with hints of black cherry, plum and violet followed by aromas of raspberry, cyclamen, vanilla, tobacco, cinnamon, chocolate and menthol. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack and pleasing crispness, however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry, plum and raspberry. Monteregio di Massa Marittima ages for 18 months in barrique followed by 4 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Broiled meat and barbecue, Stewed and braised meat with mushrooms, Roasted meat



Avvoltore 2006, Moris Farms (Tuscany, Italy)
Avvoltore 2006
Moris Farms (Tuscany, Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese (75%), Cabernet Sauvignon (20%), Syrah (5%)
Price: € 30.00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
Avvoltore shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of purple red, little transparency. The nose denotes intense, clean, pleasing, refined and elegant aromas that start with hints of black cherry, plum and black currant followed by aromas of blueberry, violet, vanilla, dried rose, tobacco, cinnamon, chocolate and menthol. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, full body, intense flavors, agreeable. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry, plum and black currant. A well made wine. Avvoltore ages for abou 12 months in barrique followed by 6 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Game, Roasted meat, Braised and stewed meat, Hard cheese






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News


 In this section are published news and information about events concerning the world of wine and food. Whoever is interested in publishing this kind of information can send us a mail to our address.

 




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  Not Just Wine Issue 67, October 2008   
AquavitaeAquavitae Wine ParadeWine Parade  Contents 
Issue 66, September 2008 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 68, November 2008

Aquavitae

Review of Grappa, Distillates and Brandy

 

Distillates are rated according to DiWineTaste's evaluation method. Please see score legend in the "Wines of the Month" section.



Grappa di Verdicchio Anniversario, Fazi Battaglia (Marches, Italy)
Grappa di Verdicchio Anniversario
Fazi Battaglia (Marches, Italy)
(Distiller: Distilleria Aquileia)
Raw matter: Pomace of Verdicchio
Price: € 25.00 - 500ml Score:
This grappa is colorless and crystalline. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas of apple, pear, almond, peach, apricot and banana, with almost imperceptible alcohol pungency. In the mouth has intense flavors, with perceptible alcohol pungency which tends to dissolve rapidly, good correspondence to the nose, balanced sweetness, agreeable. The finish is persistent with flavors of peach, pear and almond. Distilled in discontinuous alembic still. Alcohol 44%.



Grappa Nobile Stravecchia, Fassati (Tuscany, Italy)
Grappa Nobile Stravecchia
Fassati (Tuscany, Italy)
(Distiller: Distilleria Bonollo)
Raw matter: Pomace of Prugnolo Gentile (85%), Canaiolo Nero (10%), Mammolo (5%)
Price: € 36.00 - 500ml Score:
Grappa Nobile Stravecchia shows a very pale straw yellow color, crystalline. The nose denotes intense, clean and pleasing aromas of plum, black cherry, vanilla, hazelnut, dried fig and licorice, with almos imperceptible alcohol pungency. In the mouth has intense flavors, with perceptible alcohol pungency which tends to dissolve rapidly, good correspondence to the nose, perceptible sweetness. The finish is persisten with flavors of plum, black cherry and licorice. This grappa ages for 18 months in cask. Alcohol 45%.



Grappa di Dolcetto, Casa Luparia (Piedmont, Italy)
Grappa di Dolcetto
Casa Luparia (Piedmont, Italy)
Raw matter: Pomace of Dolcetto
Price: € 11.50 - 50cl Score: Wine that excels in its category
This grappa is colorless and crystalline. The nose denotes intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas of blackberry, plum, cherry, raspberry, strawberry, hazelnut and violet, with almost imperceptible alcohol pungency. In the mouth has intense flavors, with perceptible alcohol pungency which tends to dissolve rapidly, good correspondence to the nose, balanced sweetness, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of cherry, hazelnut and raspberry. A grappa made with a discontinuous alembic still operating at low pressure. Alcohol 42%.



Grappa Historia 90 Anni Edizione 2008, Magnoberta (Piedmont, Italy)
Grappa Historia 90 Anni Edizione 2008
Magnoberta (Piedmont, Italy)
Raw matter: Pomace of Muscat Blanc
Price: € 170.00 - 3l Score:
Grappa Historia shows a pale golden yellow color, crystalline. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas of grape, vanilla, peach, apricot, pear, lavender, dried fig and hazelnut, with almos imperceptible alcohol pungency. In the mouth has intense flavors, with perceptible alcohol pungency which tends to dissolve rapidly, excellen correspondence to the nose, balanced sweet and roundness, agreeable. The finish is very persistent with flavors of grape, peach and pear. Grappa Historia is made with a discontinuous alembic still operating at low pressure and ages for about 7 years in cask. Alcohol 42%.








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  Not Just Wine Issue 67, October 2008   
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Wine Parade


 

The best 15 wines according to DiWineTaste's readers. To express your best three wines send us an E-mail or fill in the form available at our WEB site.


Rank Wine, Producer
1 San Leonardo 2001, Tenuta San Leonardo (Italy)
2 Chianti Classico Riserva Novecento 2000, Dievole (Italy)
3 Bradisismo 2003, Inama (Italy)
4 Wine Obsession 2001, Vignamaggio (Italy)
5 Blanc des Rosis 2006, Schiopetto (Italy)
6 Sforzato di Valtellina San Domenico 2002, Triacca (Italy)
7 Barolo Bussia 2001, Prunotto (Italy)
8 Aglianico del Vulture La Firma 2004, Cantine del Notaio (Italy)
9 Collio Bianco Col Disôre 2004, Russiz Superiore (Italy)
10 Sangiovese di Romagna Superiore Riserva Thea 2005, Tre Monti (Italy)
11 Barolo Cannubi Boschis 2001, Sandrone (Italy)
12 Sagrantino di Montefalco Collepiano 2003, Arnaldo Caprai (Italy)
13 Moscato d'Asti 2007, Vignaioli di S. Stefano (Italy)
14 Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 2000, Zenato (Italy)
15 Sforzato di Valtellina Canua 2001, Conti Sertoli Salis (Italy)

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