Wine Culture and Information - Volume 17
Home Page About Us:Write Us:Back Issues:Advertising:Index 
Events Polls Serving Wine EnoForum EnoGames Wine Places Aquavitae Wine Guide


Issue 110, September 2012
Contents


Editorial    Summary of Editorial column
 DiWineTaste Goes Android
DiWineTaste Mobile: the Android application. DiWineTaste always with you in your pocket!
The next month, October 2012, DiWineTaste will celebrate its ten years of activity spent in telling wine and distillates sensorial tasting. We will then enter our eleventh year, certainly a goal of which we are proud of, while… [more]



Wine Tasting    Summary of Wine Tasting column
 Alcohol in Tasting
Clear and limpid: alcohol in its pure form shows as a transparent and crystalline liquid
The element most commonly associated to wine is not only responsible for the drunkenness it can cause, it is also a fundamental element in taste and in balance of every wine… [more]
 Wines of the Month
Soave Motto Piane 2011, Fattori (Veneto, Italy)
Sagrantino di Montefalco Collepiano 2008, Soave Motto Piane 2011, Sagrantino di Montefalco Passito 2008, Recioto di Soave Motto Piane 2010, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano 2009, Verdicchio di Matelica Vertis 2010… [more]


Events    Summary of Events column
 News



 Aquavitae
Grappa di Brunello Riserva, La Fornace (Tuscany, Italy)
Review of Grappa, Distillates and Brandy, Grappa di Brunello Riserva… [more]
 Wine Parade



   Share this article   Share on Google+   Summary of Editorial column  
  Editorial Issue 110, September 2012   
DiWineTaste Goes AndroidDiWineTaste Goes Android  Contents 
Issue 109, Summer 2012 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 111, October 2012

DiWineTaste Goes Android


 The next month, October 2012, DiWineTaste will celebrate its ten years of activity spent in telling wine and distillates sensorial tasting. We will then enter our eleventh year, certainly a goal of which we are proud of, while wishing to do even better. To us, who have always believed on network and Internet - it was 2002 - the connection with devices belonging to this category, computer and mobile devices, represents the primary mean for the spreading of our job. As mobile devices are getting more and more common - not only phones, but also tablets - this requires to take in consideration this new way of using the network. As far as we are concerned, this trend is also witnessed by the high number of visits our site receives from users using these devices, a sign what we write and offer to our readers, is also appreciated when “they are on the go”.


 

 It is now many years DiWineTaste is offering the possibility to use part of its services in pages expressly dedicated to mobile devices - available at the page www.diwinetaste.com/mobile - a possibility which has been very successful in the course of the years. They however are WEB pages developed in order to offer an essential service to all mobile devices capable of connecting to the Internet, therefore a service with a minimal impact on phone costs for our users. Despite the simplicity of mobile pages, our readers continue - after many years - to appreciate and to use them on a daily basis. The availability of new platforms and new systems, as it is commonly known, offers new possibilities of development and communication, such as in the case of the so called smartphones, small computers controlled by dedicated operating systems, capable of running programs expressly developed for them.

 At the moment, Android and iPhone are the system mainly used for mobile devices - phones and tablets - with an increasing spreading for both, although, in this period, it is Android to receive a higher appreciation from consumers and market. It is right on the Android system we focused our attention in order to continue the evolution of DiWineTaste, by exploring new possibilities for the spreading of our articles, our guides and our services. We therefore developed DiWineTaste Mobile application - or app, as they are generally called - a tool expressly developed for devices which make use of Android. Just like every Android application, DiWineTaste Mobile is available in Google Play Store and can be downloaded for free. It is however the first release and, as such and just like any other software project, it is in an evolution state and development, just like our site.


DiWineTaste Mobile: the Android
application. DiWineTaste always with you in your pocket!
DiWineTaste Mobile: the Android application. DiWineTaste always with you in your pocket!

 DiWineTaste Mobile application is currently offering you most of the services available on our site, some of them, revised and adapted to the need of the ones who are using a mobile device, including - of course - the availability of the magazine, which you can read “on the go”. You will also find all of our Guides - Wine Guide, Aquavitae and Wine Place Guide - always at your service wherever you are, to give you an advice about a wine or a distillate when you are at the restaurant, as well as searching for a restaurant or a wine shop. Besides that, you will always be informed and up to date about our events and polls, which you can vote directly from your Android device, as well as EnoGames, very appreciated by all of our readers. Moreover, our application includes another tool very popular among our readers as well as very appreciated: the alcohol test. The same consideration expressed for the alcohol test available in our site is also true for the one available in the application: it must not be considered as an “exact” tool; it just gives an approximate value in order to understand whether what you are appreciating in a glass is still pleasure or abuse.

 Moreover, the application also offers the possibility of customizing its behavior in order to have it adapted to your need and preferences. You can, for example, choose the size of the font to be used for the magazine's articles, save your wines, distillates and places in personal lists of “favorite items”, in order to have them always at hand when you need them. Moreover, and the same is also true for our site, you can give your support and express your opinion about the wines, distillates and places reviewed in our Guides. You can do that from your Android device in order to let you tell us your experience and opinion in the very moment you are sitting at the table of a restaurant while appreciating a good wine. Please consider that in order to review wines and distillates, or vote a place, it is required to be registered users. Most of you will certainly know the registration is free and you can do that also from DiWineTaste Mobile application.

 Like already said, it is however an evolving project: we are confident that with times and with your precious contribution, just like what already happened for our site with your mails and suggestions you keep on giving us, this application can grow up and develop in order to become more and more useful and rich. I like the idea these words of mine are being read in this very moment by some readers who already downloaded DiWineTaste Mobile on his or her mobile device. The same pleasure, of course, to know it is now ten years readers all over the world keep on reading our magazine, both the PDF edition as well as the WEB edition. Knowing this is also happening in an Android device and by using our new application, makes this job even more interesting and amazing. Like I wrote ten years ago in the first editorial of DiWineTaste - mentioning the famous quote of Lao Zi's Dao De Jing - I go on from that point and say this is a new step for DiWineTaste project. We all wish, just like ten years ago, this new step will take us to new places and wherever you are. I hope you will like DiWineTaste Mobile and may it give you the same pleasure and satisfaction it gave me while I was developing this application and to give it to all our readers for free. On this regard, I must thank all the ones who, in the course of these months of development, have contributed in a fundamental and precious way by testing this application as well as with right and useful suggestions. By using our application, DiWineTaste will always be with you, at your service, right in your pocket. Download it from Google Play Store: it is free. Enjoy it!

Antonello Biancalana






   Share this article   Share on Google+   Summary of Wine Tasting column  
  Wine Tasting Issue 110, September 2012   
Alcohol in TastingAlcohol in Tasting Wines of the MonthWines of the Month  Contents 
Issue 109, Summer 2012 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 111, October 2012

Alcohol in Tasting

The element most commonly associated to wine is not only responsible for the drunkenness it can cause, it is also a fundamental element in taste and in balance of every wine

 Among the many components found in wine, alcohol certainly is the most deplorable one. Not because it is alcohol, indeed for the notable effects it can cause to the organism. On this regard, it should be noticed nothing is good or bad: it is always the use, or the abuse, one makes of it to make it either one or another. In fact, what gets alcohol under accusation are the consequences derived from its abuse, of course not for its moderate and intelligent consumption. It is not in fact anything new the moderate and wise use of alcohol can also be beneficial for the organism, whereas the abuse - in this case everyone agrees on that, no exception - besides being an idiot and foolish act, which is not justifiable and agreeable in any case, it is frequently cause of damages to the organism, also chronic and irreversible. Pleasure is different from the disgraceful condition caused by dependency, in particular when it causes deprecable consequences both for oneself and others.


 

 Good and right, bad or wrong, alcohol is however a fundamental component in wine, it probably is the element which historically determined the interest of humans towards this beverage during the journey of the history of human beings. Poets, writers, historians and philosophers of every era, have always praised the virtues of wine and of that characteristics it had to give joy and cheerfulness, to relief the soul, corroborate the spirit and body. In every culture and society in which wine was found, it was always considered as a sacred beverage, destined to the most significant rites, probably because of the inebriating effects of alcohol, as well as for the association - in particular red wine - it could easily evoke with the sacred liquid which could maintain humans alive, that is blood. On this regard, it could be mentioned the eucharistical use of wine in Christian religious rites, taking its origin from this analogy.

 It is now some time market is offering wine without any alcohol in it, produced with an industrial process called dealcoholization, however the importance of alcohol in sensorial tasting and in wine balance is fundamental. On this regard, it should be noticed wine is produced by the alcoholic fermentation of grape juice, a process that, unavoidably, brings to the production of alcohol and, in case it is not properly done, to the production of vinegar. The wine itself exists because of the existence of alcohol and the complex biochemical process producing it thanks to the action of yeast, but - this must be said and remembered - wine is not alcohol only. If we consider the average content of alcohol in wine, this generally represents 13% of the beverage, therefore it is not the main element. Wine, as it is commonly known, is a complex beverage, not only from a sensorial point of view, but also from a chemical point of view, where alcohol represents one of the hundreds of element making it.

 Alcohol, like already said, is the result of fermentation, a biochemical process done by yeast, unicellular organisms that, in absence of oxygen, convert sugar into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide. Fermentation, as a matter of fact, is the process ensuring survival to yeast when there is no oxygen available, thanks to the conversion of sugar. At the beginning of this complex process, yeast can survive in condition of aerobic breathing - that is, in presence of oxygen - and during this stage sugar is converted into water and carbon dioxide. When the oxygen has been completely consumed, the process continues in anaerobic conditions - that is in absence of oxygen - and it is during this stage the process is called fermentation, ensuring survival with the energy obtained from sugar only. Fermentation is however a process leading to a lethal end for yeast, both because of the consumption of the only energy source, sugar, as well as because ethyl alcohol, when found in high quantity, is toxic for their survival.


Clear and limpid: alcohol in its pure form
shows as a transparent and crystalline liquid
Clear and limpid: alcohol in its pure form shows as a transparent and crystalline liquid

 The fermentation process therefore ends - provided favorable environmental conditions - both because of the total consumption of sugar, as well as for the high quantity of alcohol that in certain cases is produced by yeast. Without sugar, yeast have no possibility of survival and of nourishment, a condition which unavoidably brings to the end of the biological activity, leaving to the liquid a certain quantity of ethyl alcohol. It should be said the process of fermentation also produces other substances, although in lower quantity than ethyl alcohol, among the many, the “famous” and widely debated sulfur dioxide. At the end of fermentation - technically called alcoholic or primary - yeast will give back grape juice transformed into wine, a complex beverage and characterized by countless aromas and flavors, in which ethyl alcohol plays a fundamental role. It should also be said the so called alcohol free wines are produced by this very process, to which, at the end of fermentation, alcohol is eliminated by using specific methods, in particular, the most common ones are inverse osmosis and cold distillation.

 For the sake of information, it should be said sometimes the process of dealcoholization is used for table wines as well in order to lower the alcohol volume of few units. Blind tasting tests done on dealcoholized wine, or partially dealcoholized wines, have proven the process of alcohol removal also removes other components of wine, in particular aromatic substances. In fact, alcohol plays an active role in the perception of gustatory substances, and in particular, olfactory substances. This can be explained, among the many factors, thanks to the capability of alcohol to volatilize, by literally lifting up aromatic substances from the surface of wine, therefore favoring their olfactory perception, both intensity as well as quality and variety. For this reason, most of the times systems used for dealcoholizing wines provides for the recovery and subsequent reintroduction in the wine of the aromatic fraction extracted during the removal of alcohol, a reintroduction that - in any case - will not have the same intensity and quality of its original form.

 Alcohol by volume currently found in table wines has an average value of 13.5%, however it is not rare to find value reaching 14.5%, sometimes even higher than that. In past times, however not so distant, alcohol by volume was lower, with an average value of 12.5%, a value that, not only represented the average volume, but also considered as average-high. Today this value is considered as average-low and it is pretty hard to find wines with an alcohol by volume of 12.5%. The reasons for the increasing of alcohol by volume are many. Climate changes of the last years, characterized by a pretty hot and torrid summertime, greatly affected the ripeness cycle of grapes and, with that, the development of sugar, therefore increasing their quantity. Yeast, like already said, use sugar to conduct fermentation: with a higher quantity available, fermentation is longer and, at the same time, it is also produced a higher quantity of alcohol.

 Alcohol is one of the many elements contributing to gustatory balance of wine, specifically, it is one of those components defined as soft, that is useful in balancing all the substances defined as hard. As it is commonly known, one of the primary characteristics defining quality in wine is balance. An excessively round and smooth wine - a sensation to which alcohol contributes - makes the gustatory profile of wine flat and dull, without any trace of lively touch. A too much alcoholic wine, and not properly balanced, will in fact cause this sensation in the mouth, besides being too much “hot” because of the typical caustic and irritating effect on taste buds. The typical tactile sensation of alcohol can in fact be diminished by a proper balance, such as increasing astringency or acidity in a wine.

 It should be noticed balance of alcohol does not lower the quantity found in a wine, it simply lowers its perception. This means that, at the taste, a wine can be perceived less alcoholic than it is for real, however the quantity of alcohol does not undergo any kind of change. We can consider, for example, a wine produced with the Nebbiolo grape. Fermentation of the must of this grape tends to produce significant quantity of alcohol - sometimes higher than 14% - however the presence of acid substances and astringency, both the typical astringency of the grape as well as the one of the cask, make the wine balanced and, with that, also the alcoholic sensation perceived in the mouth will seem milder. It is therefore a relative perception and not quantitative one, a concept valid for every other olfactory or gustatory stimulus. Moreover, the perception of a stimulus and its intensity are also determined by the threshold of perception of each subject.

 Before discussing the organoleptic aspects associated to taste and the contribution of alcohol in a wine's gustatory profile, let's focus on the role played by this element in the perception of aromas. Ethyl alcohol is a volatile substance, therefore - as such - it tends to “lift up” from the surface of the wine and to dissolve in the air. During its volatilization, alcohol is extremely useful in the perception of aromatic substances, as it literally transports these elements upwards, therefore making their perception to the nose easier. Like already said, a wine with a low content of alcohol - or with no alcohol - seems to be less aromatic and certain olfactory components are quite attenuated and more difficult to perceive to the nose. There is however an exception to that as wines produced with the so called “aromatic” grapes, such as Muscat Blanc and Gewürztraminer, thanks to the abundance and the intensity of their aromatic components, are however well perceptible even without the help of ethyl alcohol. For example, we could consider Moscato d'Asti: despite its alcohol by volume is usually about 5%, its aromatic strength is however well perceptible.

 According to a gustatory point of view, alcohol is perceived in the mouth by means of many organoleptic sensations, both gustatory as well as tactile. The most evident and dominant sensation of alcohol is of tactile nature. The more evident tactile effect produced by alcohol is recognizable in a sensation recalling heat, usually described as a pseudocaloric effect. This caustic effect is the consequence of dryness of mouth's mucosa produced by alcohol, an irritation which can be easily confused with a “burning” sensation. The higher the quantity of alcohol, to be precise, the more the alcohol in wine is unbalanced, the stronger the burning sensation it produces. We could consider, for example, the effect of a distillate, in which the quantity of alcohol is pretty high and, although balanced by other components, the burning sensation is evident and can also last many seconds.

 When the tactile burning sensation will be over, it will finally be possible to perceive the taste of alcohol, which is basically sweet. It is not an “evident” sweetness as in the case of sugar, however the sweet sensation will be well perceptible in the taste of alcohol. Another gustatory-tactile characteristic of alcohol is roundness produced in the mouth: for this reason, and because of its basically sweet taste, alcohol is classified among “soft” components in the determination of a wine balance. Its gustatory excess - sweetness and roundness - must therefore be properly balanced by “hard” substances, such as astringency, acidity and a quantity of mineral elements. On the other hand, its presence will be useful in balancing the excess of both acidity and astringency found in a wine, therefore useful both in white wines, where acidity is a characteristic element, as well as in red wines, in which we have both acidity and - in particular - astringency produced by tannins.

 






   Share this article   Share on Google+   Summary of Wine Tasting column  
  Wine Tasting Issue 110, September 2012   
Alcohol in TastingAlcohol in Tasting Wines of the MonthWines of the Month  Contents 
Issue 109, Summer 2012 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 111, October 2012

Wines of the Month


 

Score legend

Fair    Pretty Good    Good
Very Good    Excellent
Wine that excels in its category Wine that excels in its category
Good value wine Good value wine
Prices are to be considered as indicative. Prices may vary according to the country
or the shop where wines are bought




Soave Motto Piane 2011, Fattori (Veneto, Italy)
Soave Motto Piane 2011
Fattori (Veneto, Italy)
Grapes: Garganega
Price: € 22.00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
Soave Motto Piane shows a brilliant straw yellow color and nuances of straw yellow, very transparent. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas that start with hints of apple, medlar and plum followed by aromas of almond, citrus fruits, pear, hawthorn, broom, ripe peach, pineapple and honey. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a crisp attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of peach, apple and medlar. A part of Soave Motto Piane ferments and aged in cask.
Food Match: Pasta and risotto with vegetable and crustaceans, Mushroom soups, Sauteed white meat, Roasted fish



Recioto di Soave Motto Piane 2010, Fattori (Veneto, Italy)
Recioto di Soave Motto Piane 2010
Fattori (Veneto, Italy)
Grapes: Garganega
Price: € 27.00 - 50cl Score: Wine that excels in its category
Recioto di Soave Motto Piane shows a brilliant amber yellow color and nuances of amber yellow, transparent. The nose denotes intense, clean, pleasing, refined and elegant aromas which start with hints of apricot, raisin and almond followed by aromas of honey, citrus fruit peel, lychee, dried fig, vanilla, date, candied fruits and nail polish. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a sweet attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing crispness. The finish is persistent with flavors of raisin, apricot and almond. Recioto di Soave Motto Piane ages for 12 months in part in steel tanks and part in cask.
Food Match: Fruit and cream tarts, Hard cheese



Sagrantino di Montefalco Passito 2008, Arnaldo Caprai (Umbria, Italy)
Sagrantino di Montefalco Passito 2008
Arnaldo Caprai (Umbria, Italy)
Grapes: Sagrantino
Price: € 35.00 - 375ml Score: Wine that excels in its category
This Sagrantino di Montefalco Passito shows a deep ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, little transparency. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing, refined and elegant aromas that start with hints of blackberry, black cherry and violet followed by aromas of plum, blueberry, vanilla, pink pepper, chocolate, tobacco, mace and menthol. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a sweet and tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, full body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of blackberry, black cherry and plum. This Sagrantino di Montefalco Passito ages for 15 months in barrique followed by 12 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Chocolate, Chocolate tarts, Hard cheese, Jam tarts



Sagrantino di Montefalco Collepiano 2008, Arnaldo Caprai (Umbria, Italy)
Sagrantino di Montefalco Collepiano 2008
Arnaldo Caprai (Umbria, Italy)
Grapes: Sagrantino
Price: € 27.50 Score:
Sagrantino di Montefalco Collepiano shows a deep ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, little transparency. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing, refined and elegant aromas which start with hints of blackberry, black cherry and violet followed by aromas of plum, blueberry, vanilla, peony, tobacco, pink pepper, chocolate, mace and menthol. The mouth has excellent correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, full body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is very persistent with long flavors of blackberry, black cherry and plum. Sagrantino di Montefalco Collepiano ages for 24 months in barrique followed by 6 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Game, Roasted meat, Stewed and braised meat, Hard cheese



Menfi Rosso Riserva Coda della Foce 2008, Cantine Barbera (Sicily, Italy)
Menfi Rosso Riserva Coda della Foce 2008
Cantine Barbera (Sicily, Italy)
Grapes: Nero d'Avola (40%), Petit Verdot (40%), Merlot (20%)
Price: € 15.00 Score:
Menfi Rosso Riserva Coda della Foce shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, little transparency. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas that start with hints of black cherry, plum and blackberry followed by aromas of violet, blueberry, black currant, vanilla, tobacco, chocolate, mace and menthol. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a properly tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry, blackberry and black currant. Menfi Rosso Riserva Coda della Foce ages for 16 months in cask and barrique followed by 8 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Stewed and braised meat, Roasted meat, Hard cheese



Albamarina 2011, Cantine Barbera (Sicily, Italy)
Albamarina 2011
Cantine Barbera (Sicily, Italy)
Grapes: Catarratto
Price: € 15.00 - 50cl Score:
Albamarina shows a brilliant amber yellow color and nuances of amber yellow, transparent. The nose denotes intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas that start with hints of dried apricot, dried fig and candied fruits followed by aromas of cedar, quince, peach jam, lavender, vanilla, honey and almond. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a sweet attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing crispness. The finish is persistent with flavors of dried apricot, dried fig and honey. Albamarina ages in part in barrique and in part in steel tanks.
Food Match: Dried fruit and almond tarts, Hard cheese



Cortona Sangiovese Cantaleone 2009, Capoverso (Tuscany, Italy)
Cortona Sangiovese Cantaleone 2009
Capoverso (Tuscany, Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese
Price: € 14.00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
Cortona Sangiovese Cantaleone shows a brilliant ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, moderate transparency. The nose denotes intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas which start with hints of black cherry, plum and dried violet followed by aromas of blackberry, blueberry, vanilla, tobacco and green bean. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a properly tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry, plum and blackberry. Cortona Sangiovese Cantaleone ages for 11 months in cask.
Food Match: Stuffed pasta, Roasted meat, Stewed meat



Vino Nobile di Montepulciano 2009, Capoverso (Tuscany, Italy)
Vino Nobile di Montepulciano 2009
Capoverso (Tuscany, Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese (90%), Merlot (10%)
Price: € 18.00 Score:
This Vino Nobile di Montepulciano shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, moderate transparency. The nose denotes intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas that start with hints of black cherry, plum and violet followed by aromas of raspberry, blackberry, blueberry, vanilla, cinnamon and mace. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a properly tannic attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry, plum and blackberry. This Vino Nobile di Montepulciano ages for 16 months in cask.
Food Match: Roasted meat, Stewed and braised meat, Broiled meat and barbecue



Verdicchio di Matelica Petrara 2010, Borgo Paglianetto (Marches, Italy)
Verdicchio di Matelica Petrara 2010
Borgo Paglianetto (Marches, Italy)
Grapes: Verdicchio
Price: € 5.35 Score: Wine that excels in its category  Good value wine
Verdicchio di Matelica Petrara shows an intense straw yellow color and nuances of straw yellow, very transparent. The nose denotes intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas which start with hints of apple, plum and almond followed by aromas of pear, broom, medlar and hawthorn. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a crisp attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of apple, plum and almond. Verdicchio di Matelica Petrara ages for 6 months in steel tanks followed by 2 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Cold cuts, Pasta with meat, Sauteed meat, Roasted fish



Verdicchio di Matelica Vertis 2010, Borgo Paglianetto (Marches, Italy)
Verdicchio di Matelica Vertis 2010
Borgo Paglianetto (Marches, Italy)
Grapes: Verdicchio
Price: € 7.85 Score:   Good value wine
Verdicchio di Matelica Vertis shows a pale straw yellow color and nuances of greenish yellow, very transparent. The nose denotes intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas which start with hints of apple, hawthorn and plum followed by aromas of peach, almond, broom, citrus fruits, beeswax and pear. The mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a crisp attack and however balanced by alcohol, good body, intense flavors, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of apple, plum and almond. Verdicchio di Matelica Vertis ages for 8 months in steel tanks followed by 4 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Stuffed pasta, Roasted fish, Roasted white meat, Mushroom soups






   Share this article   Share on Google+   Summary of Events column  
  Events Issue 110, September 2012   
NewsNews  Contents 
Issue 109, Summer 2012 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 111, October 2012

News


 In this section are published news and information about events concerning the world of wine and food. Whoever is interested in publishing this kind of information can send us a mail to our address.

 







   Share this article   Share on Google+   Summary of Not Just Wine column  
  Not Just Wine Issue 110, September 2012   
AquavitaeAquavitae Wine ParadeWine Parade  Contents 
Issue 109, Summer 2012 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 111, October 2012

Aquavitae

Review of Grappa, Distillates and Brandy

 

Distillates are rated according to DiWineTaste's evaluation method. Please see score legend in the "Wines of the Month" section.



Grappa di Brunello Riserva, La Fornace (Tuscany, Italy)
Grappa di Brunello Riserva
La Fornace (Tuscany, Italy)
(Distiller: Distilleria Deta)
Raw matter: Pomace of Sangiovese
Price: € 22.00 - 50cl Score:
This grappa shows a brilliant golden yellow color, limpid. The nose reveals intense, clean, pleasing and refined aromas of prune, honey, vanilla, hazelnut, chocolate and black cherry jam, with an almost imperceptible alcohol pungency. In the mouth has intense flavors with perceptible alcohol pungency which tends to dissolve rapidly, good correspondence to the nose, balanced sweetness, pleasing roundness. The finish is persistent with flavors of prune, hazelnut and honey.








   Share this article   Share on Google+   Summary of Not Just Wine column  
  Not Just Wine Issue 110, September 2012   
AquavitaeAquavitae Wine ParadeWine Parade  Contents 
Issue 109, Summer 2012 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 111, October 2012

Wine Parade


 

The best 15 wines according to DiWineTaste's readers. To express your best three wines send us an E-mail or fill in the form available at our WEB site.


Rank Wine, Producer
1 Batàr 2008, Querciabella (Italy)
2 Gran Masetto 2007, Endrizzi (Italy)
3 Collio Sauvignon Ronco delle Mele 2010, Venica (Italy)
4 Brunello di Montalcino 2006, Siro Pacenti (Italy)
5 Adarmando 2009, Tabarrini (Italy)
6 Barolo Cannubi Boschis 2005, Sandrone (Italy)
7 Franciacorta Pas Dosé Récemment Dégorgé 2006, Cavalleri (Italy)
8 Sagrantino di Montefalco Collepiano 2007, Arnaldo Caprai (Italy)
9 Brunello di Montalcino Vigneto Manachiara 2005, Tenute Silvio Nardi (Italy)
10 Avvoltore 2009, Moris Farms (Italy)
11 Rosso Conero Riserva Grosso Agontano 2007, Garofoli (Italy)
12 Trento Talento Brut Riserva 2007, Letrari (Italy)
13 San Leonardo 2006, Tenuta San Leonardo (Italy)
14 Confini 2007, Lis Neris (Italy)
15 Arkezia Muffo di San Sisto 2004, Fazi Battaglia (Italy)

Legend:  up    down    stable    new entry





Events Polls Serving Wine EnoForum EnoGames Wine Places Aquavitae Wine Guide
Home Page About Us:Write Us:Back Issues:Advertising:Index 

Privacy Policy

Download your free DiWineTaste Card  :  Test your Blood Alcohol Content  :  Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on Twitter

Download DiWineTaste
Copyright © 2002-2019 Antonello Biancalana, DiWineTaste - All rights reserved
All rights reserved under international copyright conventions. No part of this publication and of this WEB site may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, without permission in writing from DiWineTaste.