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joergwein
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Quote  Posted: 08/06/2004 7:30:14 AM GMT Next MessageTop of Page
Hello everyone!
I am new to this forum and, first of all, I would like to send my congratulations to the folks at DiWineTaste for this new service. This forum seems to be pretty good and promising.
I like sparkling wines - among the other things - and in particular German Sekt. I wonder whether you guys know this great German sparkling wine!
I think it is the most refreshing and amazing sparkling wine out there.
Of course I also like Champagne, well, I must admit, I love bubbles!!

Talk to you soon!
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
jc
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Quote  Posted: 08/06/2004 10:29:29 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Hi Jorg. Welcome. I think we can say we are all new here since the forum has only just started.

I must admit that I haven't tried Sekt yet but would love to hear what you can recommend as good labels with a general pricing. Can you share with us the method of making this wine or anything else related to it?

I understand most sekt is made from Riesling grapes. Thanks and cheers!!
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 08/06/2004 6:00:20 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Sekt is a sparkling wine from Germany and it is mainly made of Riesling as well as Pinot Blanc (Weissburgunder) or Pinot Gris (Ruländer).
Most of sekte are made from bulk process (Charmat method) and the very best are made with the classic method (bottle refermentation). Bulk process sekte are just quaffing, crisp and light, whereas the classic method ones (the very best) can be very interesting. I would recommend sekte from the following producers: Kurt Darting, Bürklin-Wolf, Theo Minges, Pfeffingen and Hubert Gänz.
Antonello Biancalana
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joergwein
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Quote  Posted: 08/06/2004 6:29:17 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Hey Antonello!!! You already hit the top of the list! The producers you mentioned are considered to be the very best and now I wonder how you could possibly know those names!
I was supposed to be the only German here!
Prices for sekte are quite variable. You can have ordinary sekte for just few euros as well as 10 euros or more. I do not know whether they are exported in Australia though.
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
jimmy
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Quote  Posted: 08/07/2004 7:29:37 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Ok, I admit I am French, so I think Champagne is simply wonderful!
I have never had this sekt you are talking about. Do you know whether it is being exported to France?
joergwein
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Quote  Posted: 08/07/2004 6:11:20 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I do not know whether sekt is exported to France. However I too like Champagne!! I think you should give a try to sekt, you may also like it!
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
wineguy
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Quote  Posted: 08/12/2004 7:51:12 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Here in the US it is "pretty" easy to find sekt, at least many wine shops sell it. I do not know whether I had the best sekts, however the ones I had were just normal and did not really catch my attention. Maybe I had the wrong brandings?
Steve
rickie
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Quote  Posted: 08/12/2004 5:50:12 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Talking about sparkling wines I think no wine compares to Champagne. It comes in many styles, from light and delicate to full bodied and creamy. It is perfect for an aperitif as well as for meals.
Contrary to common belief, I do not like the "popular" match with caviar and oysters. In my opinion caviar tastes bitter and oysters taste dull.
Anyway, if you all can suggest nice bubbles besides Champagne, well, I certainly am listening!
Richard Johnson
miclan
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Quote  Posted: 08/13/2004 7:58:07 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I certainly like Champagne, but I think Italian Franciacorta is excellent as well. I do not know whether you guys had this sparkling wines, however there are many producer in this area that make very excellent Franciacorta that are probably superior to many Champagne.
Michele Landolfi
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 08/13/2004 11:13:37 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
miclan wrote:
I certainly like Champagne, but I think Italian Franciacorta is excellent as well. I do not know whether you guys had this sparkling wines, however there are many producer in this area that make very excellent Franciacorta that are probably superior to many Champagne.

This probably is the most famous debate about sparkling wines and here in Italy it is pretty common to argue about what it is the best between the two. Franciacorta certainly is a wonderful sparkling wine, and the very same can be said for Champagne, however, in both cases there are wines that certainly are not that good. Just like for every other wine, I think we should rely on producers specific quality and - of course - the area of production is also an important issue.
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cathy
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Quote  Posted: 08/13/2004 5:48:56 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I would love to have Champagne often but to tell the truth, it is too expensive, at least here in the US, and so I rarely have it. Anyway the Champagnes I had did not really knocked my socks off, ok they were good for sure, but nothing that could really surprise me.
As everyone usually says Champagne is very good, I must end up believing I just had ordinary Champagnes that were probably far away from the real stuff.
Any good advice is welcome....
Cathy
joergwein
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Quote  Posted: 08/16/2004 7:47:11 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
cathy wrote:
I would love to have Champagne often but to tell the truth, it is too expensive, at least here in the US, and so I rarely have it. Anyway the Champagnes I had did not really knocked my socks off, ok they were good for sure, but nothing that could really surprise me.
As everyone usually says Champagne is very good, I must end up believing I just had ordinary Champagnes that were probably far away from the real stuff.
Any good advice is welcome....

Of course there are many good Champagnes to choose from, however one of my favorites is Champagne Cristal from Louis Roeder. Probably one the best Champagnes I have ever had.
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 08/16/2004 11:52:09 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
cathy wrote:
I would love to have Champagne often but to tell the truth, it is too expensive, at least here in the US, and so I rarely have it. Anyway the Champagnes I had did not really knocked my socks off, ok they were good for sure, but nothing that could really surprise me.
As everyone usually says Champagne is very good, I must end up believing I just had ordinary Champagnes that were probably far away from the real stuff.
Any good advice is welcome....

Just like every other wine, even in Champagne you can find ordinary examples as well as top notch ones. Champagne is no exception, of course, the fact that a wine is from a particular area - even prestigious areas - is not a relieable factor for quality. Wine area certainly is one of the important factors playing a role in quality, it is not the only one, it is just one of the many.
What you should rely the most is the producer: the concept of quality begins in the vineyard and ends after the wine has been bottled. There are wonderful Champagne - this is for sure - as well as ordinary ones, and this is for sure too.
The problem is that quality has a cost although we all should remember the difference between speculation and adequate prices.
Antonello Biancalana
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miclan
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Quote  Posted: 08/16/2004 5:57:48 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Talking about Italian sparkling wines, I would also like to suggest you some sweet sparkling wines, in particolar Asti and Brachetto d'Acqui. They both are sweet and aromatic sparkling wines which can be paired with desserts. I know they are far from Champagne's elegance, however they can certainly be elegant and interesting then add to this they also are low in alcohol, about 5-7%.
Michele Landolfi
jimmy
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Quote  Posted: 08/17/2004 8:06:11 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
miclan wrote:
Talking about Italian sparkling wines, I would also like to suggest you some sweet sparkling wines, in particolar Asti and Brachetto d'Acqui. They both are sweet and aromatic sparkling wines which can be paired with desserts. I know they are far from Champagne's elegance, however they can certainly be elegant and interesting then add to this they also are low in alcohol, about 5-7%.

Asti is delicious! I have never tried this Brachetto d'Acqui. I also tried Moscato d'Asti and I wonder whether it is the same as Asti.
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Quote  Posted: 08/17/2004 11:19:42 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jimmy wrote:
Asti is delicious! I have never tried this Brachetto d'Acqui. I also tried Moscato d'Asti and I wonder whether it is the same as Asti.

Asti and Moscato d'Asti are not the same. They both are made of Muscat Blanc grape, however Asti (whose exact name is Asti Spumante) is a sparkling wine made with the Charmat process, whereas Moscato d'Asti is a slightly natural sparkling wine where they interrupt the fermentation process while keeping part of the sugar and effervescence.
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wineguy
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Quote  Posted: 08/17/2004 6:08:44 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Asti and Moscato d'Asti are very popular here in the US and I often had them. They are very perfumed and aromatic, low alcohol and lots of fun. I like them served at low temperatures because, in my opinion, sweetness is more balanced.
I do not know this Brachetto d'Acqui, though.
Steve
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Quote  Posted: 08/18/2004 8:33:46 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
wineguy wrote:
Asti and Moscato d'Asti are very popular here in the US and I often had them. They are very perfumed and aromatic, low alcohol and lots of fun. I like them served at low temperatures because, in my opinion, sweetness is more balanced.
I do not know this Brachetto d'Acqui, though.

I too had Asti and I find it delicious! I love the bubbles/sweetness conbination as well as the aromas. In my opninion Asti is perfect with ice cream.
Cathy
jc
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Quote  Posted: 08/18/2004 9:26:11 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I believe Asti Spumante is a full sparkling wine produced in Charmat method. Of course Champagne is produced in a more expensive method which requires second fermentation. As mentioned by Anton, the Moscato d'Asti is a slightly sparkling wine (less effervescent and higher sugar content than Asti Spumante) which again goes through a different process.

Still nice but the main difference is that the champagne method requires more time to produce which incur higher costs. The result is that the wine retains the bubbles for longer period than other method such as charmat. I guess this is a reason Asti costs less than Champagne.

I have not tried Asti or Moscato d'Asti with ice cream but I will keep that in mind the next time. How do you have it, Cathy? I remember when I was a boy, I used to make "spiders" which is a tall glass of lemonade/ soda with one or two scoops of ice cream on the top. It was as good to see the CO2 bubbling up with the ice cream as it was a nice refreshing drink!!

I am not sure if wine connoisseurs would approve "Asti Spiders" though......
rickie
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Quote  Posted: 08/18/2004 11:04:24 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
wineguy wrote:
Asti and Moscato d'Asti are very popular here in the US and I often had them. They are very perfumed and aromatic, low alcohol and lots of fun. I like them served at low temperatures because, in my opinion, sweetness is more balanced.
I do not know this Brachetto d'Acqui, though.

I once had Asti and I liked it very much. I think it is a good combination of bubbles and sweetness and I agree it is perfect for ice cream. I would like to know more about this Brachetto d'Acqui and your contributions will certainly be appreciated. I heard of it but I have never had it.
Richard Johnson
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Quote  Posted: 08/18/2004 6:30:32 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jc wrote:
I have not tried Asti or Moscato d'Asti with ice cream but I will keep that in mind the next time. How do you have it, Cathy? I remember when I was a boy, I used to make "spiders" which is a tall glass of lemonade/ soda with one or two scoops of ice cream on the top. It was as good to see the CO2 bubbling up with the ice cream as it was a nice refreshing drink!!

I am not sure if wine connoisseurs would approve "Asti Spiders" though......

Well, I will keep in mind your "spiders" the next time I will have ice cream!
To tell you the truth, here in Italy Asti is a popular match with ice cream and most people like pouring lots of Asti on the ice cream, like to say, a "reverse spider"!
Other people like the chocolate-Asti pairing, but in my opinion chocolate is simply too much for Asti, as it is for the majotiry of wines.
Antonello Biancalana
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joergwein
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Quote  Posted: 08/19/2004 8:04:26 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Asti is a well known sparkling wine here in Germany and I personally like it. I have never tried it with ice cream and it seems this is pretty popular in Italy. I also had another sweet sparkling wine from Italy: Brachetto Acqui (I think this is the name) it is an aromatic red sweet sparkling wine that you would probably match with desserts.
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
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Quote  Posted: 08/19/2004 11:16:11 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I will remember the Asti-ice cream match the next time I am going to have both. I like the idea of pouring Asti on the top of ice cream. I think the grapey taste of this sparkling wine would enhance the fruity taste of many ice creams. Not bad as an idea!
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Quote  Posted: 08/20/2004 8:38:36 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jc wrote:
I have not tried Asti or Moscato d'Asti with ice cream but I will keep that in mind the next time. How do you have it, Cathy?

I usually pour Asti on the ice cream and I did not know it was like the Italians do!
I particularly like the combination when the ice cream is made of fruit and in particular strawberry and lemon.
Cathy
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Quote  Posted: 08/20/2004 11:20:44 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Hi Anton! "Reverse spiders" seems like a good idea too. I shall definitely try it. By the way, have you heard of people pairing other sweeter style sparkling wine with ice cream besides Asti-ice cream combination eg. Brachetto Acqui mentioned by Jorg??

However, personally I am not too sure about the chocolate-Asti combination! I am not a big fan of chocolate in the first place.

Cathy, thanks for sharing the ice-cream combo. I will certainly keep in mind about strawberry and lemon flavoured ice-creams with Asti.

Cheer!
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Quote  Posted: 08/20/2004 5:18:02 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jc wrote:
Hi Anton! "Reverse spiders" seems like a good idea too. I shall definitely try it.

Hello jc!
"Reverse Spiders" practically are the norm here in Italy when it comes to pairing Asti with ice cream. To be confident, not all people like pouring Astin on their ice cream, however it is pretty common.

jc wrote:
By the way, have you heard of people pairing other sweeter style sparkling wine with ice cream besides Asti-ice cream combination eg. Brachetto Acqui mentioned by Jorg??

Brachetto d'Acqui is another popular match with ice cream here in Italy, in particular with hazelnut ice cream. Brachetto d'Acqui is also excellent with red berried fruits ice cream, such as strawberry, blackberry, black cherry and so on. By the way, Brachetto d'Acqui is made from Brachetto grape, an aromatic grape found in Piedmont region, Italy.

jc wrote:
However, personally I am not too sure about the chocolate-Asti combination! I am not a big fan of chocolate in the first place.

I am a big fan of chocolate (fondant chocolate only) but in my opinion the match Asti-chocolate does not work at all. You know, matching chocolate to wine is not an easy task, however among the wines I would never think of there certainly is Asti!

Have a good day and wine!
Antonello Biancalana
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joergwein
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Quote  Posted: 08/23/2004 7:53:53 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jc wrote:
By the way, have you heard of people pairing other sweeter style sparkling wine with ice cream besides Asti-ice cream combination eg. Brachetto Acqui mentioned by Jorg??

I had this Brachetto Acqui here in Germany and that time I did not have the chance to pair it with any food. It is a delicious sweet red sparkling wine with a good aroma of flowers. I agree with antonello when he says it can be paired with ice cream. Maybe the next time I will have Brachetto I will also make sure to have some hazelnut ice cream at hand!
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
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Quote  Posted: 08/23/2004 11:13:01 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I too agree with antonello. Asti and Brachetto d'Acqui are both excellent match to ice cream.
However, I do not agree on what you said about the chocolate-Asti match. I tried it and I liked it. I think the strong aromas of Asti can be well matched to the strong aromas of chocolate.
Michele Landolfi
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Quote  Posted: 08/24/2004 7:47:14 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
miclan wrote:
I too agree with antonello. Asti and Brachetto d'Acqui are both excellent match to ice cream.
However, I do not agree on what you said about the chocolate-Asti match. I tried it and I liked it. I think the strong aromas of Asti can be well matched to the strong aromas of chocolate.

Many people tried to convince me about the chocolate-Asti combination and everytime I tried as hard as I could to understand what it seemed I could not understand. I always ended up with the same conclusion: chocolate covers everything of Asti, including aromas. Chocolate is just too much for Asti as well as for the majority of wines.
If I have to tell a match for chocolate, I would tell Grappa or a wine brandy, such as Cognac. Chocolate is very rich in fat which easily covers the tongue and the mouth so you need something to cleanse that, well, alcohol is the answer.
Besides that, alcohol enhances flavors, including the ones of chocolates and the ones of the distillate itself.
Antonello Biancalana
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Quote  Posted: 08/25/2004 7:37:31 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I too believe chocolate would be too much for a sparkling wine like Asti. I like chocolate and I think it goes best with brandy like Cognac or Armagnac. I rarely found a wine that could be perfectly matched to chocolate.
As this topic is about sparkling wines, I would like to know your opinion about Champagne Rosé. I think it is the most elegant and refined of Champaghes all. What do you think about it?
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Quote  Modified: 08/25/2004 6:05:12 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jimmy wrote:
I too believe chocolate would be too much for a sparkling wine like Asti. I like chocolate and I think it goes best with brandy like Cognac or Armagnac. I rarely found a wine that could be perfectly matched to chocolate.

Yep, Jimmy. I tend to agree with you and Anton. Chocolate esp dark, rich ones are hard to beat / match. It's a bit like trying to pair wines with extreme characters like Indian curries or hot Thai seafood soups.

jimmy wrote:
As this topic is about sparkling wines, I would like to know your opinion about Champagne Rosé. I think it is the most elegant and refined of Champaghes all. What do you think about it?

Thanks for bringing up this question, Jimmy. Rose or pink champagne is another great sparkling wine to me but also gives me the perception that it is usually for special occasions, most common in weddings since the pink colours sort of matches with love and romance.

The palate is usually lighter and sweeter than the "ordinary" champagne. I think it is because it is made from Pinot Noir grapes while champagne is from Chardonnay grapes. Personally I prefer the real champagne to rose champagne but that's only my personal preference.

Perhaps Anton can elaborate more on this topic and the difference of rose champages to other sparklings. Thanks.

Cheers!
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Quote  Posted: 08/25/2004 6:04:34 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jc wrote:
Perhaps Anton can elaborate more on this topic and the difference of rose champages to other sparklings. Thanks.

If I have to tell the truth, Champagne Rosé (or any other classic method rosé sparkling wine) is the style I love the most. I find rose classic methods are the most elegant and refined of them all. Of course, I also like the white style of classic method, just two different things.
If we are talking about Rosé Champagne in particular, they can be made with every grape allowed for the production of Champagne, that is Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier. The color of this style of Champagne can be obtained by means of two different method of productions.
The most common one is blending a small quantity of red wine to the cuvée (and the red wine must be made from Pinot Noir and/or Pinot Meunier) and this is the most common method today. The rest of the process is just the same as in every other classic method sparkling wine.
The other method, although more complicated and less reliable, can produce the very best results when conducted properly. This method is called saingée in French (meaning bleeding). The cuvée used for this method can be a true rose wine produced with the bleeding technique, that is by allowing the skins of the dark berried grapes to macerate with the must just to extract some color. Today there are just few producers who are using this traditional technique, however, in my opinion, it is capable of giving the very best Rosé Champagnes.
Antonello Biancalana
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Quote  Posted: 08/27/2004 7:40:57 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jimmy wrote:
As this topic is about sparkling wines, I would like to know your opinion about Champagne Rosé. I think it is the most elegant and refined of Champaghes all. What do you think about it?

I did not have the chance to taste any Champagne Rose and I must admit I have been always attracted by them. Maybe the production of this style of Champagne is very low and therefore almost impossible to find? Anyway, I would like to give them a try...
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
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Quote  Posted: 08/30/2004 7:42:59 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
joergwein wrote:
I did not have the chance to taste any Champagne Rose and I must admit I have been always attracted by them. Maybe the production of this style of Champagne is very low and therefore almost impossible to find? Anyway, I would like to give them a try...

And I sure you would be delighted to give it a try!!!
Concerning Rosé sparkling wines, I would also like to remind you Franciacorta where some producers sometimes make excellent rosé styles.
Antonello Biancalana
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Quote  Posted: 08/30/2004 11:15:13 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
antonello wrote:
And I sure you would be delighted to give it a try!!!
Concerning Rosé sparkling wines, I would also like to remind you Franciacorta where some producers sometimes make excellent rosé styles.

I too love rose Champagne and I also agree this style is the most elegant of them all. I heard about Franciacorta, however I did not know there also was a rose style. Can you provide us more information?
Richard Johnson
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Quote  Posted: 08/30/2004 6:12:58 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
rickie wrote:
I too love rose Champagne and I also agree this style is the most elegant of them all. I heard about Franciacorta, however I did not know there also was a rose style. Can you provide us more information?

I occasionally had Champagne but I think I just had the most common styles and brandings. Of course I like Champagne but all I had was white and not rose. Reading your comments it seems rose champagne is the most elegant of them all. However I would like to know whether rose champagnes are more expensive than whites, as you are saying rose champagnes are more elegant, I guess they are more expensive as well!
Steve
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Quote  Posted: 08/31/2004 7:52:54 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
wineguy wrote:
I occasionally had Champagne but I think I just had the most common styles and brandings. Of course I like Champagne but all I had was white and not rose. Reading your comments it seems rose champagne is the most elegant of them all. However I would like to know whether rose champagnes are more expensive than whites, as you are saying rose champagnes are more elegant, I guess they are more expensive as well!

Champagne Rosé usually is more expensive than regular Champagnes and it depends on the maison (the producer). At least in my opinion Champagne Rosé is more elegant than "white" Champagne. In this style of Champagne the fruit character is enhanced and with time the complexity may also be enchanting. Of course there also are very excellent white Champagnes but Champagne Rosé are probably considered as more romantic and rare.
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Quote  Posted: 09/01/2004 6:18:12 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jimmy wrote:
Champagne Rosé usually is more expensive than regular Champagnes and it depends on the maison (the producer). At least in my opinion Champagne Rosé is more elegant than "white" Champagne. In this style of Champagne the fruit character is enhanced and with time the complexity may also be enchanting. Of course there also are very excellent white Champagnes but Champagne Rosé are probably considered as more romantic and rare.

Rose Champagne are outrageously expensive at least here in the US!!!! I think they are about twice the price of a regular champagne. I had rose Champagne just once and I liked it very much. I agree on jc when he says rose Champagnes are mostly associated to romantic moments. I would definitely choose this wine for a moment like that!!
Cathy
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Quote  Posted: 09/02/2004 5:50:46 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
cathy wrote:
Rose Champagne are outrageously expensive at least here in the US!!!! I think they are about twice the price of a regular champagne. I had rose Champagne just once and I liked it very much. I agree on jc when he says rose Champagnes are mostly associated to romantic moments. I would definitely choose this wine for a moment like that!!

I have never had rose Champagne however I had Franciacorta Rosé many times. I too like rose sparkling wines and in my opinion Ca' del Bosco's Franciacorta Rosé is very good.
I do not know about rose Champagne prices, however Franciacorta Rosè usually costs a little more than regular white Franciacorta, at least here in Italy. I certainly suggest you all to give a try to Franciacorta and I am sure you will like it.
Michele Landolfi
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Quote  Posted: 09/03/2004 7:43:19 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
miclan wrote:
I have never had rose Champagne however I had Franciacorta Rosé many times. I too like rose sparkling wines and in my opinion Ca' del Bosco's Franciacorta Rosé is very good.
I do not know about rose Champagne prices, however Franciacorta Rosè usually costs a little more than regular white Franciacorta, at least here in Italy. I certainly suggest you all to give a try to Franciacorta and I am sure you will like it.

I heard about Franciacorta and I did not know it was also available as rose. I have always thought it was just one of the many classic method sparkling wine made in Italy even though I have never had it. What is the difference between rose Champoagne and rose Franciacorta?
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
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Quote  Posted: 09/06/2004 7:29:48 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
joergwein wrote:
I heard about Franciacorta and I did not know it was also available as rose. I have always thought it was just one of the many classic method sparkling wine made in Italy even though I have never had it. What is the difference between rose Champoagne and rose Franciacorta?

The main difference is the area they are from and - let me say this - it is a huge difference! They both are made with the classic method and whereas Champagne is made of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier, Franciacorta is made of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Blanc.
There are many wonderful Champagnes out there, as well as there are many wonderful Franciacortas out there. Telling which is the best is very hard, they simply are different and, like always, you should rely on the quality of producers and not only on the fame of the area.
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Quote  Posted: 09/08/2004 7:30:30 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
antonello wrote:
There are many wonderful Champagnes out there, as well as there are many wonderful Franciacortas out there. Telling which is the best is very hard, they simply are different and, like always, you should rely on the quality of producers and not only on the fame of the area.

In my own experience, I can tell there are many great Franciacorta producers - such as Ca' del Bosco, Villa, Cavalleri and Fratelli Berlucchi, just to mention a few - as well as mediocre ones. The same can be said for Champagne and for any other sparkling wine in general.
I think it is not that useful to compare Champagne and Franciacorta, they simply are two different areas, different grapes and different traditions.
Max
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Quote  Posted: 09/10/2004 7:46:17 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
maxtrek wrote:
In my own experience, I can tell there are many great Franciacorta producers - such as Ca' del Bosco, Villa, Cavalleri and Fratelli Berlucchi, just to mention a few - as well as mediocre ones. The same can be said for Champagne and for any other sparkling wine in general.
I think it is not that useful to compare Champagne and Franciacorta, they simply are two different areas, different grapes and different traditions.

I think every wine has a personality and every wine has a sense in a particular occasion. Of course there are wines that are better than others, and I think this is quite normal, after all. I love Champagne, of course, although I did not have any chance to try this Franciacorta, I would like to know more.
I think when you are having a wine, you should enjoy that wine and not thinking whether it is better or worse than others. You should enjoy the situation a wine can make and every wine is special in this sense.
Richard Johnson
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Quote  Posted: 09/20/2004 9:48:23 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
rickie wrote:
I love Champagne, of course, although I did not have any chance to try this Franciacorta, I would like to know more.

Franciacorta is a classic method wine made in the Franciacorta area, near Brescia, between Milan and Verona, north Italy. It is made with Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Blanc and it comes in many styles, including the "creamy" Satèn which is very interesting in its best expressions. Other Franciacorta styles include Brut, Demi-Sec as well as "Pas Dosé" (no dosage or zero dosage or nature) and Rose.
Antonello Biancalana
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Quote  Posted: 10/01/2004 5:54:35 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
You guys mentioned Champagne and Franciacorta as two great examples of sparkling wines. I admit I know Champagne more than Franciacorta, anyway, what do you guys think about Californian Sparkling wines? Did you every try them?
Champagne is certainly great but I also think some sparklers from California are very good as well.
Steve
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Quote  Posted: 10/05/2004 6:11:47 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
wineguy wrote:
You guys mentioned Champagne and Franciacorta as two great examples of sparkling wines. I admit I know Champagne more than Franciacorta, anyway, what do you guys think about Californian Sparkling wines? Did you every try them?
Champagne is certainly great but I also think some sparklers from California are very good as well.

I have never tried Californian sparkling wines and I do not think I have ever seen one in my area. I love sparkling wines and I think I would be more than happy to try the ones from California, provided I knew where to find some!
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
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Quote  Posted: 10/12/2004 5:50:12 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
joergwein wrote:
I have never tried Californian sparkling wines and I do not think I have ever seen one in my area. I love sparkling wines and I think I would be more than happy to try the ones from California, provided I knew where to find some!

I heard some Champagne producers moved to California and started making Champagne style wines there. Is this true? Is California similar to Champagne in this regard? Why are they moving there in order to make their Champagnes? If I am not wrong the soil of Champagne, as well as climate, are unique to this region and I am sure California is different. I am not saying California is not good as a wine region, but I believe it to be different from any other area and if Champagne is Champagne because of the region's quality, why should they make sparkling wine in Champagne style there? Is it a matter of costs or what?
Moreover, can these wines be legally sold as Champagne? Do they write something in the labels in order to tell people it is not real Champagne coming from the French Champagne region?
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Quote  Posted: 10/25/2004 5:43:43 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jimmy wrote:
I heard some Champagne producers moved to California and started making Champagne style wines there. Is this true? Is California similar to Champagne in this regard? Why are they moving there in order to make their Champagnes? If I am not wrong the soil of Champagne, as well as climate, are unique to this region and I am sure California is different. I am not saying California is not good as a wine region, but I believe it to be different from any other area and if Champagne is Champagne because of the region's quality, why should they make sparkling wine in Champagne style there? Is it a matter of costs or what?
Moreover, can these wines be legally sold as Champagne? Do they write something in the labels in order to tell people it is not real Champagne coming from the French Champagne region?

I think the two wines are completely different one from each other. Champagne and California have different climates, different soils and different wine cultures, the result is therefore different. I do not know what is better, but I am sure they are different. I think Champagne producers moved to California in order to broaden their business.
Richard Johnson
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Quote  Posted: 11/02/2004 11:02:31 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
rickie wrote:
I think the two wines are completely different one from each other. Champagne and California have different climates, different soils and different wine cultures, the result is therefore different. I do not know what is better, but I am sure they are different. I think Champagne producers moved to California in order to broaden their business.

That's what I believe, too. The two areas are so different that I cannot believe Champagne are the same as Californian sparkling wines. Maybe you are right when you say they are looking for new business opportunities. However I think the two products should be clearly diversified because at the end consumers would get confused and this is not good.
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Quote  Posted: 11/04/2004 6:12:27 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I did not know Champagne was also made in California. Do you guys mean they use the same grapes and same technique as in Champagne in order to put bubbles in their wines? In what Californian area they are doing this? Maybe Mendocino?
Cathy
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Quote  Posted: 11/10/2004 6:16:56 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
cathy wrote:
I did not know Champagne was also made in California. Do you guys mean they use the same grapes and same technique as in Champagne in order to put bubbles in their wines? In what Californian area they are doing this? Maybe Mendocino?

It is not correct to say Champagne is made in California. Champagne is made in Champagne only. In California there are some wineries making classic method sparkling wines, that is by using the methode champenoise, as it is clearly written in labels. Areas in which Californian sparkling wines are being made include Napa Valley, Sonoma, Carneros, Mendocino and Lake County.
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Quote  Posted: 12/29/2004 6:01:13 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I agree with Antonello and we should make clear the fact Champagne is made in Champagne only. Champagne is something unique and extraordinary and this is thanks to climate and soil. After all every place is unique and the same is true for California and its wines.
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Quote  Posted: 01/05/2005 6:15:46 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jimmy wrote:
I agree with Antonello and we should make clear the fact Champagne is made in Champagne only. Champagne is something unique and extraordinary and this is thanks to climate and soil. After all every place is unique and the same is true for California and its wines.

What can be said about Champagne is true - in my opinion - for every other wine and with no exception. Every wine has its own personality and character, mainly because of the area it was from, the grapes used for its production as well as other productive factors.
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Quote  Posted: 10/26/2009 8:08:58 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
antonello wrote:
jimmy wrote:
Asti is delicious! I have never tried this Brachetto d'Acqui. I also tried Moscato d'Asti and I wonder whether it is the same as Asti.

Asti and Moscato d'Asti are not the same. They both are made of Muscat Blanc grape, however Asti (whose exact name is Asti Spumante) is a sparkling wine made with the Charmat process, whereas Moscato d'Asti is a slightly natural sparkling wine where they interrupt the fermentation process while keeping part of the sugar and effervescence.

Correct, Asti is a straightforward fully sparkling wine with sweet/fruity flavors. Its usually just enjoyable as a dessert wine.

Moscato díAsti is a low-alohol, semi-sparkling wine with about half the carbonation of a typical sparkling wine, and is released very soon after the vintage to preserve its uniquely fresh character. Itís not as sweet, has a very complex perfume,

i have both of them in my database
http://www.vivino.com/san-silvestro/san-silvestro-asti-spumante-2006.html
http://www.vivino.com/valdobbiadene/val-doca-moscato-2006.html

i hope this will clear the confusion between them.
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Quote  Posted: 10/28/2009 12:42:17 PM GMT Previous MessageTop of Page
donnaclif wrote:
Moscato díAsti is a low-alohol, semi-sparkling wine with about half the carbonation of a typical sparkling wine, and is released very soon after the vintage to preserve its uniquely fresh character. Itís not as sweet, has a very complex perfume,

i have both of them in my database
http://www.vivino.com/san-silvestro/san-silvestro-asti-spumante-2006.html
http://www.vivino.com/valdobbiadene/val-doca-moscato-2006.html

i hope this will clear the confusion between them.


Here we go again! Just another post with links to your site. You pretend to be an expert and talk about Moscato d'Asti. Did you realize one of the pages you suggested refer to a Moscato made in Veneto region??? Moscato d'Asti is made in Piedmont region of Italy. Please stop posting links to your site. We are not stupid.
If you want to particpate to this forum, please stop posting ads. It is clear you are just using this forum to attract visitors to your site. We don't like this.
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!

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