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Index:Wine Forum: Does the time of tasting influence your judgement about a wine?  New Post
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miclan
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Quote  Posted: 11/17/2004 6:09:14 PM GMT Next MessageTop of Page
It sometimes happens, at least to me, that I taste a wine in a particular occasion and I find it to be good or however worth of note. Then I taste the very same wine in another occasion and the sensations and emotions it gave me the previous time seem not to belong to that wine.
In my opinion the occasion, mood, company and weather influence the judgement you give about a wine. What do you think about it?
Michele Landolfi
cas29
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Quote  Posted: 11/22/2004 4:38:57 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I think it does. I know that when we've tried wines in the area they are produced and loved them, once we get them home we wonder.. hmmm what was the fuss all about? There is a lot to be said for drinking a wine a few kilometers from where it was made, and along with local dishes.
Canadian-- but living in Italy
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 11/23/2004 6:03:15 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Time, circumstance, occasion and mood all influence the tasting of a wine as well as of foods. Cas29 focused on the fact wines taste excellent in the winery and when you get home it is a different story. It is never a good idea to taste a wine in the cellar where it is being aged or kept because in such circumstances we usually are influenced by many factors including the fact of being in front of the producer and in a "romantic" place like a winery.
Antonello Biancalana
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rickie
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Quote  Posted: 11/30/2004 11:03:38 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I definitely believe all the factors mentioned by antonello and all the others influence the judgement of a wine. And I also agree with what cas29 has said. It happened to me as well when I traveled in France and I wanted to buy some wine in a winery. I tasted the wines at the winery's wine shop and they semeed to be pretty good so I decided to buy a couple of bottles. When I got home and uncorked one of them, the wine I tasted in France was just a memory. The wine definitely was different!
Richard Johnson
cathy
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Quote  Posted: 12/06/2004 6:00:25 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I think it does. It certainly depends on your mood, company, season as well as other factors. I too can tell a wine tasted great the first time I tried it and tasted just ordinary the next time. I have never bought wine in a winery so I do not know about the "magic" involved in tasting a wine there and at home. Maybe you are simply biased when you taste a wine in the place it was made whereas when you're home you have no prejudice and you can tell about its quality better.
Cathy
jimmy
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Quote  Posted: 12/29/2004 6:02:24 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I think it absolutely does as well as it does a specific bottle. Did you ever noticed that two bottles of wine usually taste different even whe you uncork them in the very same event? I noticed this many times. The taste of the first bottle is different from the second one, I know this may sound silly, but I think this to be true. I do not know why, though.
jc
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Quote  Posted: 01/18/2005 8:49:12 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jimmy wrote:
I think it absolutely does as well as it does a specific bottle. Did you ever noticed that two bottles of wine usually taste different even whe you uncork them in the very same event? I noticed this many times. The taste of the first bottle is different from the second one, I know this may sound silly, but I think this to be true. I do not know why, though.


Hello all! well.. I can understand the psychological effect of trying wines in a "nice" setting and everything seems to be hunky dory (fantastic) and when you are somewhere else and (possibly) being alone, it is a different case.

However, there just may be a more scientific explanation to it. Although the same wine comes from one winery, some of the grapes may not have come from the same plot /batch. Then they may not come from the same barrique (if oak treated). For instance, one barrique may produce slightly stronger taste than the other. These are 2 reasons I can think of.

I believe it all comes down to quality control and of course even when the winery observed the strictest QC, we can only hope that the wine shops have proper storage conditions.

While we all hope for consistency, it is a fact that there will be "bottle variation". It is not all easy to pinpoint the exact reason for the variation.

I hope Anton and others can provide some feedback.

Thanks and cheers!
rickie
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Quote  Posted: 01/19/2005 11:04:15 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jc wrote:
Hello all! well.. I can understand the psychological effect of trying wines in a "nice" setting and everything seems to be hunky dory (fantastic) and when you are somewhere else and (possibly) being alone, it is a different case.

However, there just may be a more scientific explanation to it. Although the same wine comes from one winery, some of the grapes may not have come from the same plot /batch. Then they may not come from the same barrique (if oak treated). For instance, one barrique may produce slightly stronger taste than the other. These are 2 reasons I can think of.

I believe it all comes down to quality control and of course even when the winery observed the strictest QC, we can only hope that the wine shops have proper storage conditions.

While we all hope for consistency, it is a fact that there will be "bottle variation". It is not all easy to pinpoint the exact reason for the variation.

I hope Anton and others can provide some feedback.

Thanks and cheers!

Your explanation seems to be pretty serious and full of agreeable reasons. Maybe you are right and this could probably explain why the wines taste different when you taste them at home. Anyway it also seems strange that even the most humble winery does not observe some QC policies, after all I think they should pay attention to the reliability of their products and not having everything ruled by chance.
However your explanation deserves more attention and maybe antonello and others may add some comments to it.
Richard Johnson
cathy
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Quote  Posted: 01/25/2005 5:11:13 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jc wrote:
However, there just may be a more scientific explanation to it. Although the same wine comes from one winery, some of the grapes may not have come from the same plot /batch. Then they may not come from the same barrique (if oak treated). For instance, one barrique may produce slightly stronger taste than the other. These are 2 reasons I can think of.

I think you may be right about this and that not all bottles come from the same batch. Anyway I still think the romantic situation offered by a winery may play a role.
Moreover, if I am not wrong, wineries usually blend the wines of the same batch before bottling and this means blending many barriques or taks together. I do not know whether this is done by all wineries, however I think it has something to do with QC issues.
Cathy
jc
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Quote  Posted: 01/27/2005 2:59:03 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Cathy, you have a valid point. Sure, the surroundings and ambience of a place can greatly influence a person's overall feeling and judgement.

Regarding the QC issues you mentioned about wineries blending wines from all the barriques should be the proper practice. I also believe most, if not all of them do it for the sake of consistency.

I also think that apart from the physical environment we are in at the time of serving wine, let us not forget about the other elements which could affect the taste of wine. For example we could be in an air conditioned room one day and outdoor in the sun the next. It may sound a bit pedantic but I believe temperature is a big determinant of the taste, smell and the overall impression of a wine. Further, if we have food together with a wine and nothing at another time, it could impact on our taste buds too. The types of food and the additives can all affect our tastes.

Wine is not the most stable of liquids so if one tastes a wine in summer and then the same in winter, don't be surprised to have a different impression. Just my thoughts........

In order to minimise our bias or have a proper wine tasting, Antonello has already provided us with some professional advice in the previous issues of Diwinetaste.

Thanks and cheers!
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 01/29/2005 2:00:47 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jc wrote:
Regarding the QC issues you mentioned about wineries blending wines from all the barriques should be the proper practice. I also believe most, if not all of them do it for the sake of consistency.

As far as I know, all wineries do this practice for the sake of consistency. It is just a common practice.

jc wrote:
It may sound a bit pedantic but I believe temperature is a big determinant of the taste, smell and the overall impression of a wine. Further, if we have food together with a wine and nothing at another time, it could impact on our taste buds too. The types of food and the additives can all affect our tastes.

All the factors you mentioned play a fundamental role in the tasting of wine and of food. You may just think of what the temperature can do with foods: would you say a freshly baked bread smells and tastes like the bread you baked the day before?

jc wrote:
Wine is not the most stable of liquids so if one tastes a wine in summer and then the same in winter, don't be surprised to have a different impression. Just my thoughts...

I completely agree on this. You should also add the fact some wines are considered best suited for wintertimes (most of full bodied reds) and they would taste differently in summertime, even because of other psychological aspects.You usually find a light and crisp white wine more agreeable in summertime than in wintertime.

Good wine to all!!
Antonello Biancalana
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joergwein
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Quote  Posted: 02/04/2005 11:04:22 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
antonello wrote:
All the factors you mentioned play a fundamental role in the tasting of wine and of food. You may just think of what the temperature can do with foods: would you say a freshly baked bread smells and tastes like the bread you baked the day before?

Temperature, as far as I am concerned, has a deep impact on wine tasting and I believe it can drastically change a wine in a way you would not recognize it. I also think temperature is a matter of subjectivity. It seems red wines should be served at a higher temperature than whites, usually 16-18°C, but to be honest with you, I also like red wines served at lower temperatures and I think they are more agreeable at these temperatures than to the ones usually suggested by everyone.
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
jc
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Quote  Posted: 02/06/2005 6:11:52 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
wrote:

Temperature, as far as I am concerned, has a deep impact on wine tasting and I believe it can drastically change a wine in a way you would not recognize it. I also think temperature is a matter of subjectivity. It seems red wines should be served at a higher temperature than whites, usually 16-18°C, but to be honest with you, I also like red wines served at lower temperatures and I think they are more agreeable at these temperatures than to the ones usually suggested by everyone.


Hi Jorg, I think some light bodied reds may be suitable to be served at lower temperatures like rose or beaujolais but I don't think it is a good idea to serve full bodied, dry reds at anything lower than 16 C.

I was dining last night and was served a chilled red wine - Montepulciano d Abruzzo (probably at around 12 or 13C. Although it wasn't a full body red, I didn't think it should be served chilled. It was a very disappointing experience at a fine dining restaurant! Thumbs down to this restaurant!!
rickie
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Quote  Posted: 02/25/2005 6:14:20 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jc wrote:
I was dining last night and was served a chilled red wine - Montepulciano d Abruzzo (probably at around 12 or 13C. Although it wasn't a full body red, I didn't think it should be served chilled. It was a very disappointing experience at a fine dining restaurant! Thumbs down to this restaurant!!

Here we go again with the wine service subject! I too have had such an experience the past month and it was truly disappointing. In my case was a Bordeaux and we all had to wamr the glasses with our hands before drinking the wine. Do they really know what wine service means?
Talking about Montepulciano d'Abruzzo, and according to my opinion, I think this wine comes in many styles, from light bodied to full bodied ones. And to tell the trurh I think the light bodied one can be served chilled, not the full bodied styles though. Just my opinion...
Richard Johnson
cathy
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Quote  Posted: 03/24/2005 6:24:49 PM GMT Previous MessageTop of Page
rickie wrote:
Here we go again with the wine service subject! I too have had such an experience the past month and it was truly disappointing. In my case was a Bordeaux and we all had to wamr the glasses with our hands before drinking the wine. Do they really know what wine service means?
Talking about Montepulciano d'Abruzzo, and according to my opinion, I think this wine comes in many styles, from light bodied to full bodied ones. And to tell the trurh I think the light bodied one can be served chilled, not the full bodied styles though. Just my opinion...

I think some reds may be served chilled. Am I wrong? I agree Bordeaux is not the best wine to be served chilled, but there are some light bodied wines which I like the most when served chilled. However I agree with you all: most of the times the quality of wine service is very disappointing and low!
Cathy

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