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Index:Distillates and More: Grappa  New Post
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wineguy
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Quote  Modified: 08/11/2004 6:22:16 PM GMT Next MessageTop of Page
Hello everyone!
I recently had grappa and I was completely amazed with that. A friend of mine bought a bottle of this brandy and came over for dinner last night. I did not know it and I was surprised by the aromas and round taste. He told me it is an italian brandy and that's all he knew. I found some information on DiWineTaste which certainly helped, but now I want to know where I can find more. How many style of grappa are there?
Steve
rickie
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Quote  Posted: 08/08/2004 10:32:34 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Here in England grappa is getting more and more popular and I certainly like it. I must admit the style of grappa I like the most is the one aged in oak. It is rounder and richer, well, at least in my opinion. I too have read DiWineTaste's report about grappa and I found it very informative. Maybe Antonello can tell us more about grappa.
Richard Johnson
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 08/09/2004 8:14:50 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
rickie wrote:
Here in England grappa is getting more and more popular and I certainly like it. I must admit the style of grappa I like the most is the one aged in oak. It is rounder and richer, well, at least in my opinion. I too have read DiWineTaste's report about grappa and I found it very informative. Maybe Antonello can tell us more about grappa.

Grappa is by favourite brandy and I must admit I like it best in its traditional form, that is non aromatized. I also like aged grappa as well as monovarietal grappas. I would suggest you to read our report about grappa which can find at this address: www.diwinetaste.com/dwt/en2002107.php.
I would also like to suggest you our monthly column dedicated to brandies, spirits and grappas: aquavitae.
Antonello Biancalana
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joergwein
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Quote  Posted: 08/11/2004 6:06:11 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Can you guys suggest me a good Grappa? I have always heard about this Italian spirit but I have never had some. If you can give me some suggestions about grappas that I can find here in Germany it would be very appreciated. Thanks.
Jörg - A passion for Italian wine!
cathy
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Quote  Posted: 08/13/2004 5:47:57 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I have never had grappa and, to tell the truth, I do not know much about it. Do you guys think it is sold in the US?
Is it comparable to Cognac?
Cathy
jimmy
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Quote  Posted: 08/17/2004 8:05:20 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
cathy wrote:
I have never had grappa and, to tell the truth, I do not know much about it. Do you guys think it is sold in the US?
Is it comparable to Cognac?

I do not think Italian grappa is comparable to Cognac. Cognac is distilled wine whilst grappa is distilled pomace. Did you ever try Marc de Champagne? It is a fine brandy made of distilled pomace from Champagne.
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 08/17/2004 11:18:41 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
jimmy wrote:
I do not think Italian grappa is comparable to Cognac. Cognac is distilled wine whilst grappa is distilled pomace. Did you ever try Marc de Champagne? It is a fine brandy made of distilled pomace from Champagne.

Grappa is certainly not comparable to Cognac and Cognac is not comparable to Grappa! They are two different products and both being excellent. There are very fine grappas that one could not imagine such a finesse and elegance in a distillate. Grappa is the triumph of grape and of its aromas, although it can be aged in wood, it is the grape essence to play the main role.
Antonello Biancalana
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wineguy
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Quote  Posted: 08/17/2004 6:08:18 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I agree that Grappa is completely different from Cognac or any other brandy. Cognac is good, of course, however I also liked Grappa.
Brandies are very spicy whereas grappa keeps fresh fruit and floral aromas.
I have one more question: at what temperature is grappa supposed to be served?
Steve
rickie
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Quote  Posted: 08/18/2004 11:03:35 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
wineguy wrote:
I agree that Grappa is completely different from Cognac or any other brandy. Cognac is good, of course, however I also liked Grappa.
Brandies are very spicy whereas grappa keeps fresh fruit and floral aromas.
I have one more question: at what temperature is grappa supposed to be served?

Grappa and Cognac are definitely two different things. I personally grappa chilled although a friend of mine who is Italian says it should be drunk at about 16-18°.
He also said grappa is the Italian national brandy.
Richard Johnson
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 08/18/2004 6:29:49 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
wineguy wrote:
I agree that Grappa is completely different from Cognac or any other brandy. Cognac is good, of course, however I also liked Grappa.
Brandies are very spicy whereas grappa keeps fresh fruit and floral aromas.
I have one more question: at what temperature is grappa supposed to be served?

Grappa certainly is the Italian national brandy!
At what temperature should grappa be served? Well, even here in Italy this is a widely discussed issue. There are some who like grappa well chilled, others who like it at room temperature and even other who like it in the "in between".
If you serve grappa at low temperature you will also lower the alcohol impact on your mouth but you will also lower the aromas of this distillate. If you serve it at "room temperature" the effect of alcohol will be evident and the aromas will get coarser.
Maybe the "in between" is the best choice and should be seen as a good compromise. Grappa should be ideally served at a temperature ranging from 14-18°C, depending on personal preferences.
Antonello Biancalana
DiWineTaste
miclan
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Quote  Posted: 08/23/2004 11:11:58 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
Talking about grappa, I would also like to remember the other important Italian spirit: acquavite d'uva. It certainly is less popular than grappa, however it is a good product for sure.
Michele Landolfi
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 08/24/2004 7:46:39 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
miclan wrote:
Talking about grappa, I would also like to remember the other important Italian spirit: acquavite d'uva. It certainly is less popular than grappa, however it is a good product for sure.

The acquavite d'uva (grape brandy) certainly is a very elegant and refined distillate which is very different from grappa. Of course there are very elegant and refined grappas and acquavite d'uva (or any other acquavite) cannot be considered better than grappa, just different.
I personally love acquavite d'uva as well as grappa, provided they are good and well made!
Antonello Biancalana
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rickie
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Quote  Posted: 08/24/2004 6:37:23 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
I have never heard of this acquavite d'uva and I would like to know more. What is the difference between grappa and this brandy? You said acquavite d'uva is a grape brandy. Isn't grappa a grape brandy as well?
Richard Johnson
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 08/25/2004 6:03:57 PM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
rickie wrote:
I have never heard of this acquavite d'uva and I would like to know more. What is the difference between grappa and this brandy? You said acquavite d'uva is a grape brandy. Isn't grappa a grape brandy as well?

I understand there could be a sort of confusion about these two products, however grappa and acquavite d'uva are not the same. Grappa is produced by distillating grape pomace (also known as marc) whereas acquavite d'uva is produced by distillating fresh fermented grape juice, pulp and skin.

Antonello Biancalana
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rickie
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Quote  Posted: 08/30/2004 11:14:29 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
antonello wrote:
I understand there could be a sort of confusion about these two products, however grappa and acquavite d'uva are not the same. Grappa is produced by distillating grape pomace (also known as marc) whereas acquavite d'uva is produced by distillating fresh fermented grape juice.

Isn't fermented grape juice considered wine?? In this case acquavite d'uva is just like any other wine brandy. Did I miss something?
Richard Johnson
antonello
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Quote  Posted: 09/01/2004 7:41:58 AM GMT Previous MessageNext MessageTop of Page
rickie wrote:
Isn't fermented grape juice considered wine?? In this case acquavite d'uva is just like any other wine brandy. Did I miss something?

Acquavite d'uva is produced by considering grape like any other fruit, such as strawberry, apple, raspberry and so on. Fruit brandies are pretty popular in Italy and they can be fermented in order to obtain an alcoholic substance to be distilled. Grape is no exception, of course. We know grape is used for the production of wine and we usually consider wine the product of grape fermentation and this is true, of course.
However soon after the fermentation of grape juice is over, we do not usually consider this result as drinkable, in fact every wine is considered as such after a proper time of aging.
Acquavite d'uva is produced by distillating a fresh fermented grape juice, pulp and skin which have very different aromas and tastes from what we consider wine, therefore the distillation of this liquid does not give wine brandy, indeed it gives grape brandy, or acquavite d'uva, like we Italians call it.

Antonello Biancalana
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vinorum
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Quote  Posted: 07/10/2011 5:02:31 PM GMT Previous MessageTop of Page
antonello wrote:
wineguy wrote:
I agree that Grappa is completely different from Cognac or any other brandy. Cognac is good, of course, however I also liked Grappa.
Brandies are very spicy whereas grappa keeps fresh fruit and floral aromas.
I have one more question: at what temperature is grappa supposed to be served?

Grappa certainly is the Italian national brandy!
At what temperature should grappa be served? Well, even here in Italy this is a widely discussed issue. There are some who like grappa well chilled, others who like it at room temperature and even other who like it in the "in between".
If you serve grappa at low temperature you will also lower the alcohol impact on your mouth but you will also lower the aromas of this distillate. If you serve it at "room temperature" the effect of alcohol will be evident and the aromas will get coarser.
Maybe the "in between" is the best choice and should be seen as a good compromise. Grappa should be ideally served at a temperature ranging from 14-18°C, depending on personal preferences.


Sure that is a national brand: In Italy there is a town that have "grappa" in is name! Personally i prefer to drink grappa at room temperature
http://www.inciso.it

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