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  Editorial Issue 10, Summer 2003   
Summer WinesSummer Wines MailBoxMailBox  Contents 
Issue 9, June 2003 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 11, September 2003

Summer Wines


 Summer has come and days are getting warmer and warmer, preparations for vacations are finally done and everyone is about to leave for those destinations that, hopefully, will give relaxing and tranquil moments. This is what is expected by the ones who decided to spend their summer somewhere else or can afford a vacation time. For all of us, wine lovers and lovers of nice wine, hopefully a little but good, no matter what was decided about how and where to spend summertime, whether at home in one's own city, or in sunny beaches or in the cool mountain breeze, we do not certainly forget, despite of the warm temperature, about that pleasure that a good wine can give.

 Summer days suggest and make people prefer cool beverages, those that can promise with their inviting temperature, a relief to the torments of hot, even foods, rightly, get adapted to the needs requested by the typical conditions of summertime. During this period in our tables are showing up foods made of vegetables, usually fresh salads, condiments get less and less heavy, the cooking of foods gets simpler and lighter and red wines, in particular the full bodied and “important” ones, usually matched with elaborated and rich foods, are being replaced by lighter wines. In this season there is an increasing consumption of white and sparkling wines, mainly because they are served at low temperatures and therefore they are more appealing.


 

 White and sparkling wines are practically associated to summertime, unfortunately they are served at too low temperatures, therefore losing, at these low temperatures, their best characteristics, in particular aromas, attenuated or annihilated by the rigid cold of refrigerators. Sparkling wines, with their joyous and vivid effervescence, seems to quench thirst and to give more satisfactions during the hot summer days and, in this season, are the fresher and younger sparkling wines, in particular the ones produced with the Charmat method, to be preferred best, generally as aperitifs. Besides these wines, there is also an increasing consumption of white wines and slightly sparkling wines, and this would confirm that in summertime effervescent beverages are the more successful ones.

 Even though in these periods red wines are usually “forgotten”, there is another style of wine which is forgotten as well and that could be very pleasing and fresh, certainly suited for summertime and not only in this season: rose wines. These type of wines have always been penalized because they are between the most common styles of wines usually referred as real wines, whites and reds, and for this reason they are probably never considered, indeed, they often are, unjustly, defined as low quality wines and for that worth of little interest. Rarely people remember about rose wines: it is true, they are not whites nor reds, they are rose, and they are however and indisputably wines. Nevertheless rose wines have unique and proper characteristics that make them perfectly suited for being between whites and reds, when a white wine is not enough and a red wine is simply too much, rose wine offers the right solution that can be adapted to many circumstances. Moreover they are wines usually consumed young, when they can express a pleasing crispness and fragrance of aromas, they can be served cool, sometimes at the usual temperatures of white wines. So, why not remembering about these wines and, hopefully, right in this summer? Rose wines are perfect with many dishes made of fish, in particular soups and roasts.

 If it is true that reds are temporarily “forgotten” during summertime, it is also true that not all reds are the same. Generally, when one thinks about red wines, the common idea is to think about full bodied wines, robust and thick, nevertheless there are so many red berried grapes that produce light wines, with little tannins and very pleasing to drink, particularly in summertime. Just like for rose wines, these wines can be served at low temperatures, certainly not like white wines, however at temperatures that will surely be pleasing in hot days, they perfectly match with the typical summer foods and have the fragrance and the crispness of fruit, flavors and aromas certainly welcome in summertime. Like rose wines, these type of wines are forgotten as well and they have little consideration, the personality of great red wines makes these wines appear as lesser wines, while usually forgetting that a full bodied red wine is not always suited for every circumstance. After all, the world of wine is amazing and interesting also thanks to the many and countless styles available.

 However, even in summertime, there also are occasions where a great red wine can be appreciated, most of the times during evening meals, when people usually spend more time in appreciating nice foods, there are many who do not renounce to the pleasure of a nice glass of full bodied red wine, even though it can result in a wrong food match, but, you know, the ones who like nice wine, when right occasions happen they always take advantage of them. What is important, no matter what wine you will choose for spending your summertime, is to always remember that moderation is the best way to appreciate the fascinating world of wine.

 We would like to wish our readers a happy summer, hopefully in company of a nice glass of wine, and we remind our readers we are going to take a break in august and the next issue of DiWineTaste will be published in September, in that period when the world of wine, at least the one of the northern hemisphere, will be greatly involved with new harvests. We also wish all wine producers that honored us with their trust, a very profitable harvest in the hope, and we do not have any doubt about that, they will be capable of giving us new emotions expressed in the magic of a glass. Happy summer vacations to you all and see you in September!

 



   Share this article   Share on Google+   Summary of Editorial column ABC Wine 
  Editorial Issue 10, Summer 2003   
Summer WinesSummer Wines MailBoxMailBox  Contents 
Issue 9, June 2003 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 11, September 2003

MailBox


 In this column are published our reader's mail. If you have any comment or any question or just want to express your opinion about wine, send your letters to our editorial.

 

I would like to know which red wines can be matched to dishes made of fish and served at a low temperature.
Claudio Daniele -- Vibo Valentia (Italy)
The so famous rule that fish must be matched with white wine exclusively represents, as a matter of fact, the most frequent choice, certainly not the only one. Even red wines can be happily matched with many dishes made of fish, in particular with roasts and soups, especially when are rich and elaborated. The scarce success and scarce spreading of the matching of red wines with fish is because of the “metallic” taste, usually not very pleasing, which is perceived in the mouth and this is believed to be a chemical reaction between phosphates present in fish and traces of iron bound to tannins, in particular to pigments. The matching of red wine and fish is however possible provided the chosen wine has little tannins, just like Pinot Noir, or that have been in contact with skins for a short time during maceration therefore avoiding tannins to be extracted. Red wines having some “crispness”, that is some acidity, are also suited as well and this characteristic is usually common in wines poor in tannins in order to have them balanced. If we consider the products available on the market, one can realize there are many red wines poor in tannins, a factor which also depends both by the kind of grape used and by the vinification technique. If a wine is poor in tannins, therefore it is also suited for being served at a low temperature; red wines are usually served at higher temperatures because astringency of tannins is exalted by cold, therefore a higher temperature makes this wines “smoother” and less aggressive. Another valid alternative for the matching of fish is also offered by rose wines, unfortunately not very considered, not only in the matching of fish, indeed they are extremely versatile and agreeable.



What is the difference between Sauternes and Barsac?
Douglas Hamilton -- New Castle (Australia)
These famous and precious wines are named after the two cities where they are produced, Sauternes and Barsac, in the southern area of Bordeaux's Graves, France. These two cities are involved in the production of sweet wines whose grapes, thanks to the climate conditions of those places, are being attacked by the “noble mold”, the so called Botrytis Cinerea. The two wines are to be considered of excellent quality and the grapes used for their production are the same, most of the times Sémillon and some Sauvignon Blanc and, sometimes, Muscadelle as well, whereas they differ for the production area. The two cities are located on the banks of Ciron river, which ends its course on the Garonne river, a favorable condition which allows the developments of the precious noble mold. Between the two commons, Sauternes is the largest and certainly also more famous, whereas Barsac is smaller, and this does not mean it is less prestigious. Grapes affected by Botrytis Cinerea are scrupulously harvested and then pressed in order to have a must which will be subsequently fermented and aged in cask for at least two years. At the end of this period the wine is bottled and usually sold, or further aged in producers' cellars. These wines are usually very longeval and can also stand to more than 30 years of aging while developing extraordinary characteristics. Both Sauternes and Barsac should never be consumed young, indeed they should be aged in bottle for at least 10 years in order to appreciate a development of the organoleptic characteristics.



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  Editorial Issue 10, Summer 2003   
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