Wine Culture and Information - Volume 17
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  Editorial Issue 52, May 2007   
One Hundred Thousand!One Hundred Thousand! MailBoxMailBox  Contents 
Issue 51, April 2007 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 53, June 2007

One Hundred Thousand!


 One Hundred Thousand! For many this could sound not very important, but for us, who are working in this project since almost five years, it is a good result. Of course it could be better, however, we think it is a good result anyway. The last month of March, after months of waiting, we have finally seen our readers to grow until reaching one hundred thousand. After having waited for months, by reading the figures of the statistics, it seemed the average number of our readers would have stopped at 95,000, then reached 97,000, finally in the month of March the average number of DiWineTaste's readers has reached 100,000! This was one of our goals and for which we worked hard and that - finally - we have reached. This was not only because of us, of course. The merit is also of you all, dear readers, who every month download our magazine or read it on line, who use the services available in our site daily and send us your appreciation with the many letters we receive every day. We like the idea of sharing this important success with you all, because - undoubtedly - this is also the success of you all, of all DiWineTaste's readers.


 

 It is also the success of whom, in these years, has sent comments and criticisms - which we do not have always agreed on but we have always respected and listened to - and allowed us to improve DiWineTaste, to change and renew some aspects, to let our magazine meet the expectations of our readers. Our thanks also go to the many producers who in these years have granted us their trust and have sent their wines and distillates to us, therefore allowing us to talk about their job and on what they do believe and pass it to the time by enclosing it in a bottle of glass. In this sense, we like to remember the fundamental principle on which we have always based our editorial job since the beginning of this adventure. DiWineTaste is - and has always been - an independent publication from everything and from everyone, never depending on whoever is ready to accept certain compromises, as well as not agreeable ways, only because they want to have the sad satisfaction of seeming what they are not.

 The review of wines and producers in DiWineTaste have always been done with the same criteria: the only thing we asked producers is to ship their wines to our office and nothing more. This can be witnessed by the over 450 producers who trusted us and believed in our editorial project. We believe this is the correct and honest way to review wine and make information, also, and in particular, in respect of our readers - and without them we would not be here today to comment this result - last but not the least, also for the respect of whoever makes wines or distillates and believes in his or her job. Also for this reason we never believed it could be right to be in a pulpit and to speak “absolute” verdicts, neither about wines nor distillates, neither about producers, including the opinions and job of our colleagues who - like us - write about wine. In our comments we just limit ourselves to simply tell a wine or a distillate the way we met and saw it, uniquely allowing us the expression of a score - our diamonds and stars - in order to give a “measure” of our appreciation.

 We do not think it would be right to tell which wines should be bought and what wines should be avoided. Besides considering this behavior to be correct, we are aware of the fact what we do not like may be liked by others, and vice versa. The relationship each one of us has with pleasure - including the pleasure of wine and distillates - is so personal that would be presumptuous to define it or to suggest it, even worse, to impose it. And we have no intention to make this editorial look like a praise to our job in the useless intent of being considered better than others. We are absolutely aware we are not, we are aware of the fact what we did so far can be improved and we have so many things to learn. However, despite there is so much things to improve, for the moment we are happy to celebrate all of our one hundred thousand readers: a result which is also the result of the appreciation of all of you readers who read our magazine every month.

 It has been a long way to get here, a sequence of changes and the introduction of new services. The first substantial change was in September 2003 - after one year from the beginning of our project - with the publication of the new site. The first “interactive” service offered to our readers was published in January 2003: DiWineTaste Wine Guide. Of the many other services and changes introduced during the period of our activity, we would like to mention the last one - DiWineTaste Mobile - which allows the free use of Wine Guide, Aquavitae and Services Directory from a mobile phone, a very appreciated service by our readers and which suggests good places where enjoying wine as well as getting information about wines and distillates. Also the polls are very appreciated by our readers and which receive hundreds of votes every day. A tool to let us know our readers better as well as to understand the opinion of consumers. Not to mention EnoGames, they too being very appreciated by our readers.

 In about five years we tried to spread the culture of wine, of wise drinking, to offer our modest contribution to the vast world of wine, to the pleasure of tasting and moderation. In about five years we have poured in our glasses about 2,200 wines of over 430 producers, all of them commented in our Wine Guide, one of the most used and appreciated interactive services by our readers. We like the idea of celebrating this important result with our readers, and although we would have liked to celebrate it differently, the least we can do is to say thanks to everyone from the deep of our heart, to the ones who read our magazine since 2002, to all the ones who joined us in the course of the years. Thanks to all of you, dear readers: if DiWineTaste has reached one hundred thousand readers, if it reached today this important goal and if it continues to exist, it certainly is because of your fundamental contribution and of your appreciation, of your comments as well as of your criticisms, always useful and always accepted. Thanks to you all!

 



   Share this article     Summary of Editorial column ABC Wine 
  Editorial Issue 52, May 2007   
One Hundred Thousand!One Hundred Thousand! MailBoxMailBox  Contents 
Issue 51, April 2007 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 53, June 2007

MailBox


 In this column are published our reader's mail. If you have any comment or any question or just want to express your opinion about wine, send your letters to our editorial or fill in the form available at our site.

 

First of all, congratulations for your site, both for the contents and the way they are organized. I would like to ask a couple of questions about the tasting of wine at the restaurant. As the purpose is to make sure the wine has no faults, why is the glass swirled therefore favoring the oxygenation of wine? Is this procedure also done for sparkling wines and champagne?
Matteo Brandi -- Grosseto (Italy)
Thanks for your compliments: we wish DiWineTaste will always be of your satisfaction and of your interest. As for your two questions, the tasting of wine at the restaurant is a procedure which is done for every wine, including sparkling wines and champagne. Generally speaking, it is the sommelier - or however the person in charge of serving wine in a restaurant - to make sure the wine ordered by the client is in good conditions and has no faults. For this reason, the sommelier tastes the wine before offering it to the client, and in case he or she thinks the wine is in good conditions, offers a glass to the client for tasting. The first phase is usually omitted and, after having uncorked the bottle, a small quantity is poured in the client's glass who will taste it and decides about its good condition. As you rightly observed, the glass is being swirled in order to favor the oxygenation of the wine. Indeed, this operation should be done after having evaluated “opening” aromas - that is the aromas made of light molecules requiring a small quantity of oxygen in order to volatilize - an operation which is done by holding the glass still and without swirling. After having checked the absence of faults in this first phase, the glass is then swirled and a second smell is done: this operation favors the volatilization of “heavy” molecules. If also in this phase are not found faults, a small sip of wine is finally tasted, therefore ending the evaluation. Finally, it should be considered temperature: faults are easily recognized at higher temperatures.



I own a small vineyard from which I harvest the grapes for the production of a home made wine. As the quantity is of about some tens of liters, I ferment the must in demijohns which are also used for the aging. Is the use of demijohns negative for the fermentation and aging of wine?
Marco Menicucci -- Jesi, Ancona (Italy)
The use of demijohns in home wine making has no disadvantages, provided all the necessary precautions for the biological stability of wine are being followed. In presence of small quantities - like in your case - the use of casks or tanks has some unpractical inconveniences, as the small quantity would not allow the complete filling, therefore leaving the wine dangerously exposed to the negative effects of air. It is therefore better to use a demijohn, having a volume such to allow the complete filling during aging. During fermentation, it can be used the special demijohn “air-lock caps”, available in specialized wine making shops. During aging it will be paid attention to fill the demijohn up to some centimeters below the opening, by isolating the wine exposed to the air with a layer of vaseline oil, or with special paraffin discs containing allyl isothiocyanate - that is the essence of mustard - which will make the space between wine and cap aseptic. It should be remembered these discs must be periodically replaced. Finally the place where demijohns are being kept must be dark, with the right temperature and moisture, and which should be kept as much constant as possible.



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  Editorial Issue 52, May 2007   
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