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 ABC Wine  Share this article     Summary of Wine Tasting column Wine Producers 
  Wine Tasting Issue 9, June 2003   
Tasting Red WinesTasting Red Wines Wines of the MonthWines of the Month  Contents 
Issue 8, May 2003 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 10, Summer 2003

Tasting Red Wines

After the delicate and enchanting fresh flowers fragrances of white wines, this months we will discuss about the evaluation of red wines

 Red wines, certainly more complex in the evaluation than whites, are generally considered, in the common sense about this subject, the ones that usually are associated with the idea of wine. These types of wine, produced with different methods than whites, have specific organoleptic characteristics which requires an adequate evaluation strategy in order to find out and appreciate their best properties. In general terms, what is usually adopted for white wines, does not have the same efficiency when applied to red wines, mainly because of the presence of other factors usually absent in any other style of wine. The differences are clearly evident as soon as appearance is considered, aromas are different as well, most of the time are the result of the aging in a cask, and in the flavor are usually found elements which are absent in other wines, such as astringency.

 

Color

 The color of red wine, even when it is quickly evaluated, allow the determination of some of its main characteristics. The range of colors in this type of wine is rather vast, determined by the type of grape, area and cultivation practices, the way the grape was turned into wine and the evolution process, in other words, its aging level. A first consideration that can be made about the colors of these wines is that, contrary to white wine which tends to get darker in color as time goes by, red wines tend to get lighter in color with time.


 

 Talking about colors in red wines it should be said that, as opposed to what it is usually believed, the intensity of its color is not always a sign of quality. The intensity in red wines must be considered according to the variety of grape used for its production and, in particular, the coloring capacity of the grape, that is, the quantity of pigments it contains, last but not the least, the way they were transformed into wine. A red wine having a color not much intense could indicate an absolutely normal condition and coherent with some types of grapes, however, it could also indicate a short period of maceration, or grapes from harvests of high yields or from a particularly rainy season. In order to make this concept clearer, it could be useful to observe the color of two wines very different from each other, such as a Cabernet Sauvignon and a Pinot Noir, and realizing that, no matter they both are excellent wines, the one produced with Pinot Noir will certainly have a less intense color when compared to the other. Not all the grapes are the same, and this is true for the color of wines they produce.

 In youth red wines will show, in a more or less evident way and according to the grape used for their production, strong blue or purple nuances, mainly observable in the rim of the liquid mass while keeping the glass tilted. As time goes by, these blue and purple nuances will tend to disappear and the color of wine will get a more strong red tint, in particular ruby red, and it will subsequently get garnet tints and, as the aging process goes by, red tints will tend to diminish while getting orange or brick tints, and therefore getting, at the end of its life cycle, brown or mahogany colors, a sure sign the decay has finally come to an end or because of strong oxidations. It should be however observed that by evaluating the evolution of colors it can be uniquely determined the process of the aging evolution of a wine, not its age considered as the quantity of years passed from harvest. The velocity at which the aging process takes place depends on many factors, among the many, the kind of grape used to make the wine and how the wine was kept, and the quantity of time in which a wine reaches a specific level of aging is variable from wine to wine. It must also be considered that the most reliable information about the level of aging of wine can be determined by observing the colors nuances, that is the color of the rim of the liquid mass in a tilted glass, instead of its tint, that is the overall color of the liquid mass. The following list contains the most common tints in red wines and the information that can be determined:

 

  • Purplish Red - This is the typical color of young wines, and in case blue or violet tints are very evident, it could also be the sign of an immature wine whose fermentation process ended recently. However it should be observed not all young wines show this color; the many species of grapes have quantities and qualities of pigments rather different from one each other, therefore grapes which are rich in blue/violet pigments will usually tend to produce wines that in youth will be characterized by this color and in other cases, the purplish tint will be evident even when the wine will have reached an advanced level of aging
  • Ruby Red - Represents the color of the first aging level which follows youth and the loss of the purplish tint. In general terms, red wines get this color after about one or two years of aging. This color is certainly the most common one in red wines and, in particular wines produced with specific grapes, this could also indicate the best aging level, the one that would allow the best appreciation. In case of wines destined to long aging periods, this color should be considered as a sign of youth
  • Garnet Red - This color usually indicates a wine whose aging process is proceeding towards maturity while leaving its youth time. According to the type of wine as well as the grape used to make it, this color is usually observable after two or four years of aging and it can accompany the evolution of red wines even for many years before getting to a full and complete maturation
  • Brick/Orange Red - Represents the tint which is typical in wines that finally reached full and complete maturation conducted in excellent keeping conditions. It should be observed that not all type of wines, according to the grapes used for their production and the technique of wine making, can reach this level while keeping at the same time excellent organoleptic characteristic. For some wines, that certainly should have been consumed earlier in their youth, this color indicates the loss and the degradation of their best characteristics. It must also be observed that this color can also be caused by oxidation, therefore the wine is not appreciable anymore. In case oxidation occurred, this can be easily confirmed by the olfactory evaluation. This color, when observed in young wines, can be the sign of a rapid aging probably because of a too high keeping temperature. The time needed for wines kept in the best conditions to get to this color, in general terms, can vary from five to ten years, in some wines, it could also take longer
  • Mahogany - In case this color is observed in wine's tint, that is in its overall color, it is the result of a strong and excessive oxidation as well as being sign of some degenerative diseases, therefore the wine is not drinkable anymore. This color can be considered as a positive sign only and uniquely in rare, very rare cases and when met in wines of excellent and magnificent quality, which reached the apex of an extraordinary aging process conducted in excellent and impeccable keeping conditions. It can be observed, in case of such magnificent wines, after an aging period in bottle for more than twenty years and, often, these wines can remain in excellent conditions for many other tens of years, before taking their way for decay. Once again, it must be said this condition belongs to few, very few wines; most of the cases, as well as when amber nuances are being observed, when this tint is present in wines aged for some years, it always represents a negative factor

 

Aromas

 The aromatic range of red wines is rather vast, in particular, it is rather high the expectations of the taster when he or she is about to taste a red wine. These types of wine are considered, at least for the majority of wine lovers, the ones which are usually associated to the idea of wine, therefore one usually expects from these wines superior characteristics because of this “prejudice”. Indeed, the aromatic variety in reds seems to be more complex because of its higher versatility and suitability to aging, a characteristic which allows aromas to evolve and to get “important” connotations. However it should be remembered that red wines are produced with a fruit, the grape, and therefore will be the aromas of fruit, just like in any other wine, the ones that will be more frequently perceived in its olfactory assessment.

 Whereas in white wines are frequently found aromas of flowers, in red wines are fruit aromas the ones that will prevail, in particular fruits having a red pulp or skin, such as raspberry, strawberry and cherry, or black, such as black currant, blackberry and blueberry. However aromas of flowers can be found as well, even though they are less frequent than fruit, such as rose, violet, peony and cyclamen. Aromas of fresh fruit will be common is young red wines as well as in those wines which are beginning their aging process. As time passes by, aromas of fruit start to evolve and to turn into cooked fruit, in particular jams, and subsequently in candied fruit. Even aromas of dried fruit, such as hazelnut or dried fig, can be found during the aging process in a red wine and these aromas can be perceived after a very long time of aging. In red wines can also be perceived, during the aging process, aromas of seasoning and aromatic herbs, such as rosemary, thyme and mint.

 During the evolution of the aging process in red wines, other aromas develop as well, usually having nothing in common with fruit, as a consequence both of production factors and of evolution. The most easy ones to be perceived are the ones passed by wood to wine during the aging in cask. These aromas can resemble toasted, smoked and vanilla. Moreover, “unusual” aromas can be perceived as well, such as coffee, cocoa, chocolate and tobacco, as well as spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and black pepper. In some wines, as a consequence of long time of aging, there can also be perceived aromas of tar. An aroma which is often found in red wines, particularly in quality wines, is licorice, an elegant aroma that, when present, gives wine a touch of class.

 The long aging of wines in bottle can result in reductive conditions, that is the progressive diminishing of oxygen, and as time goes by, it contributes to the formation and to the development of particular and complex aromas, as a consequence of years of patient and long aging. The aromas which usually originates from this condition are of animal and foxy nature, a condition which is usually preceded, in those wines which are subject to this kind of evolution, by aromas of leather. The series of “animal” aromas evolves with time until getting real and proper smells of animal's fur, wet fur and game, as well as aromas of civet and musky secretions.

 Moreover, the aromatic range in red wines is enriched, in some cases, with balsamic essences, such as eucalyptus, pine, resin and incense, as well as aromas of vegetal origin such as bell pepper and truffle. In particular, the aroma of bell pepper, especially the green one, can be indicative about the variety of grape, as well as the maturation level of grapes used to make the wine. This aroma particularly indicates the presence of Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc, sometimes it can be perceived in Merlot grape as well, however it can be perceived in wines produced with grapes not perfectly mature at the time of harvesting. Another aroma which usually indicates a specific type of grape is the one of black pepper, generally associated to Syrah grape, however it can also be found in other wines, especially when are aged in cask. Violet is an aroma which usually identifies Nebbiolo and Sangiovese grapes, as well as rose is a characteristic of Brachetto grape.

 

Taste and Balance

 During the gustatory evaluation, red wines are usually more complex than white wines. The main cause of this “complexity” is astringency, because of the presence of tannins, both passed from cask's wood and the ones extracted from grape's skins. Astringency in red wines, caused by tannins, is usually the element which plays a fundamental role in the determination of balance. A fundamental element which is capable of balancing astringency in red wines is alcohol and, besides that, it is also responsible for balancing any acidity or sapidity in wine. Diagram shown in figure illustrates the relation among the many elements present in red wines responsible for balance.

 It must be observed tannins and acidity tend to exalt one each other, therefore a red wine, in order to be balanced, in case is characterized by a high quantity of tannins it will have a pretty low acidity, on the other hand, a crisp red wine, that is having an evident acidity, will not have much tannins. As a consequence, alcohol, responsible for the burning sensation in the mouth, must be present in adequate quantities in order to balance the sum of quantities of both tannins and acid.

 

Practical Application


Balance in Red Wines
Balance in Red Wines

 The best way to understand red wines, just like any other style of wine, is to personally evaluate them by means of one's own senses. The practical application that we are going to suggest for red wines allow the evaluation of the many organoleptic characteristics and, in particular, how the presence of the many element can influence balance. In order to try the practical application we suggest, it is required to have three wines: a plain Cabernet Sauvignon produced in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy), a Merlot having two or three years of aging in bottle as well as aged in barrique, possibly produced in Tuscany (Italy) or California (USA), and a Pinot Noir aged for two or three years and produced in Bourgogne (France) or in Alto Adige (Italy).

 The appearance of the three wines shows rather different intensities and colors. Pinot Noir will be one having the lighter color of them all and will show a higher transparency, whereas Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot will both have colors and nuances practically similar. The first information that can be determined by these observations is that Pinot Noir has a lesser coloring capacity, that is contains a little quantity of pigments, as opposed to the other two grapes, however this does not mean it produces low quality wines, indeed, Pinot Noir is considered among the great grapes capable of producing high quality wines. This initial evaluation should help in suppressing the prejudice that wines having light colors are usually not very good, provided they are produced with quality production criteria. Even at the nose the three wines will offer different aromas. In Pinot Noir will be perceived aromas of cherry, raspberry, red currant and strawberry, as well as aromas of vanilla as a sign of the probable aging in cask. Merlot's aromas will probably be rather different. In this wine will be perceived, first of all, aromas of vanilla and oak because of the aging in cask, however it will be possible to perceive clear aromas of black cherry, blueberry, plum, probably aromas of blackberry, as well as aromas of jams and violet. In Cabernet Sauvignon will emerge an aroma that could be pretty surprising and that would not be expected to be found in a wine: the aroma of green bell pepper. This “curious” aroma will not probably be the dominant one, however it will be clearly recognizable among other good aromas of black currant, blueberry, black cherry and, more likely to be, even eucalyptus. Lastly, it could be perceived, also in this wine, an aroma of vanilla, sign of the aging in cask.

 Even in the mouth the wines will taste differently. Pinot Noir will seem to be more crisp, that is more acid, if compared to the other two wines, and its astringency, produced by tannins, will be pretty low. Merlot will certainly have a lower acidity, however a higher astringency will be perceived, even though smooth and pleasing, produced by tannins. Merlot will seem to have a greater structure and more body as opposed to Pinot Noir. Lastly, Cabernet Sauvignon will have an even greater astringency if compared to the other two wines, a sensation of astringency more aggressive and less smooth, and a good body. It should be considered that quantity of alcohol will probably be the same in all the three wines, probably from 12 to 13 percent of alcohol by volume, however the wines, although having different levels of astringency, will be balanced. In Pinot Noir, having a low astringency, balance is obtained thanks to the higher quantity of acid whereas in the other two wines acidity is lower while the astringency is higher.

 



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  Wine Tasting Issue 9, June 2003   
Tasting Red WinesTasting Red Wines Wines of the MonthWines of the Month  Contents 
Issue 8, May 2003 Follow DiWineTaste on Follow DiWineTaste on TwitterIssue 10, Summer 2003

Wines of the Month


 

Score legend

Fair    Pretty Good    Good
Very Good    Excellent
Wine that excels in its category Wine that excels in its category
Prices are to be considered as indicative. Prices may vary according to the country
or the shop where wines are bought




Barbera del Monferrato Rossad'Ocra 2000, Cascina Maddalena (Italy)
Barbera del Monferrato Rossad'Ocra 2000
Cascina Maddalena (Italy)
Grapes: Barbera
Price: € 13,00 Score:
The wine shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, moderate transparency. The nose reveals intense aromas of fruit, in particular black cherry, blueberry, blackberry, plum, violet and hints of vanilla. In mouth is correspondent to the nose, has a crisp attack balanced by tannins and alcohol, good body and intense flavors. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry and blueberry. Rossad'Ocra is aged in barrique for about 12 months.
Food Match: Roasted meat, Braised meat with mushrooms, Hard cheese



Monferrato Rosso Bricco della Maddalena 1998, Cascina Maddalena (Italy)
Monferrato Rosso Bricco della Maddalena 1998
Cascina Maddalena (Italy)
Grapes: Barbera
Price: € 25,00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
The wine shows a brilliant ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, moderate transparency. The nose reveals clean and intense aromas, mainly of fruit, such as black cherry, blueberry and plum followed by aromas of violet cinchona, pine tree, licorice and vanilla. In mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a crisp and tannic attack however balanced by alcohol, present in good quantities. Good body and intense flavors. The finish is persistent with good flavors of black cherry and plum. This wine is aged in barrique for 12-15 months.
Food Match: Game, Braised and stewed meat with mushrooms, Hard cheese



Grechetto dei Colli Martani Terre di San Nicola 2001, Di Filippo (Italy)
Grechetto dei Colli Martani Terre di San Nicola 2001
Di Filippo (Italy)
Grapes: Grechetto
Price: € 4,60 Score: Wine that excels in its category
The wine shows a light straw yellow and nuances of straw yellow, very transparent. The nose reveals intense, clean and pleasing aromas of pineapple, banana, hawthorn, jasmine, lemon, apple, hazelnut, pear and peach. In mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a pleasing crisp attack however well balanced by alcohol. Intense and very agreeable. The finish is persistent with pleasing flavors of pear, lemon and apple. This Grechetto is aged in steel tanks.
Food Match: Boiled fish, Crustaceans, Pasta and risotto with vegetables and fish, Sauteed meat, Appetizers



Colli Martani Sangiovese Riserva Properzio 1999, Di Filippo (Italy)
Colli Martani Sangiovese Riserva Properzio 1999
Di Filippo (Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese
Price: € 5,80 Score:
The wine shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, moderate transparency. The nose reveals refined, clean, intense and pleasing aromas of black cherry, blueberry, plum, violet, carob, licorice and vanilla. In mouth has a tannic attack however balanced by alcohol, good correspondence to the nose, intense flavors and good body. The finish is persistent with good flavors of plum, black cherry and blueberry. A well made wine which will give its best within 2 years, however it is already drinkable. Properzio is aged in barrique.
Food Match: Game, Broiled meat and barbecue, Roasted meat, Hard cheese



Ruris 2001, Fattoria Colsanto (Italy)
Ruris 2001
Fattoria Colsanto (Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese, Merlot, Sagrantino
Price: € 8,00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
The wine shows a brilliant ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, moderate transparency. The nose reveals intense, clean and elegant aromas, mainly of fruit, such as black cherry, blueberry, blackberry, plum and black currant followed by good aromas of vanilla, caramel and cocoa as well as hints of green bell pepper. In mouth has good correspondence to the nose, a slightly tannic attack however well balanced by alcohol, good body and intense flavors. The finish is persistent with good flavors of black cherry, plum and blueberry. Ruris is aged for 10 months in barrique.
Food Match: Roasted meat, Hard cheese, Stuffed pasta



Montefalco Rosso 2001, Fattoria Colsanto (Italy)
Montefalco Rosso 2001
Fattoria Colsanto (Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese, Sagrantino
Price: € 9,00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
The wine shows a brilliant ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, moderate transparency. The nose denotes intense, pleasing and clean aromas, mainly of fruit, such as black cherry, raspberry, blueberry, blackberry and violet followed by pleasing aromas of vanilla, licorice as well as hints of coffee. In mouth reveals good correspondence to the nose, a slightly tannic attack however well balanced by alcohol, good body and intense flavors. The finish is persistent with flavors of black cherry, blackberry and plum. This wine is aged for 15 months in barrique followed by 3 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Roasted meat, Stewed meat, Hard cheese, Stuffed pasta



Chianti Classico Lucarello Riserva 1999, Borgo Salcetino (Italy)
Chianti Classico Lucarello Riserva 1999
Borgo Salcetino (Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese, Canaiolo Nero
Price: € 13,00 Score:
The wine shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, moderate transparency. The nose reveals pleasing, intense and elegant aromas, mainly of fruit, such as black cherry, raspberry, blueberry, blackberry and plum followed by intense and good aromas of violet and vanilla as well as hints of chocolate. In mouth is round and pleasing, very balanced, with smooth tannins and good body, intense flavors and good correspondence to the nose. The finish is persistent with pleasing and clean flavors of black cherry, blueberry and plum. A well made wine. This Chianti reserve is aged in barrique followed by a long period of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Braised meat with mushrooms, Roasted meat, Broiled meat and barbecue, Hard cheese



RosSole 2000, Borgo Salcetino (Italy)
RosSole 2000
Borgo Salcetino (Italy)
Grapes: Sangiovese (70%), Merlot (30%)
Price: € 10,40 Score:
The wine has an intense ruby red color and nuances of ruby red, little transparency. The nose reveals good personality with intense, clean, elegant and refined aromas of black cherry, blackberry, plum and black currant followed by good aromas of vanilla, licorice and cocoa as well as hints of menthol. In mouth is elegant and round, with pleasing tannins and good correspondence to the nose, good balance, intense flavors and good body. The finish is persistent with good flavors of black currant, black cherry and plum. A well made wine. RosSole is aged in barrique for 14 months followed by a long period of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Braised meat, Roasted meat, Broiled meat and barbecue, Hard cheese, Game



Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Gio 1997, Santa Sofia (Italy)
Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Gioé 1997
Santa Sofia (Italy)
Grapes: Corvina (65%), Rondinella (30%), Molinara (5%)
Price: € 35,00 Score: Wine that excels in its category
The wine shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, little transparency. The nose reveals personality with elegant, intense, clean and refined aromas mainly of jams. There can be perceived good aromas of black cherry jam, blackberry jam and plum jam followed by pleasing and clean aromas of black cherry macerated in alcohol, cocoa, caramel, leather, licorice, enamel, violet and vanilla. In mouth has a tannic attack which is well balanced by alcohol, excellent correspondence to the nose, intense flavors and full body. The finish is persistent with pleasing and clean flavors of blackberry jam, black cherry jam and plum jam. A very well made wine. Amarone Gioé is produced in limited quantities and only in particularly favorable vintages and ages for 48 months in cask and 8-12 months in bottle.
Food Match: Roasted meat, Hard cheese, Game, Braised meat, Stewed meat



Predaia 1998, Santa Sofia (Italy)
Predaia 1998
Santa Sofia (Italy)
Grapes: Cabernet Sauvignon (85%), Corvina and Rondinella (15%)
Price: € 12,50 Score:
The wine has a brilliant ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, moderate transparency. The note denotes good personality with elegant, intense, clean and refined aromas of black cherry, blueberry, bell pepper, plum, black currant and violet followed by good aromas of vanilla, toasted, caramel and chocolate. In mouth is round, agreeable and balanced, with good correspondence to the nose, smooth tannins, intense flavors and good body. The finish is persistent with clean and pleasing flavors of plum, blueberry and black cherry. A well made wine. Predaia is aged for 12 months in barrique and for 24 months in cask followed by 8-12 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Roasted meat, Stewed meat, Braised meat, Game, Hard cheese



Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 1997, Le Ragose (Italy)
Amarone della Valpolicella Classico 1997
Le Ragose (Italy)
Grapes: Corvina (50%), Rondinella (20%), Molinara (20%), other grapes (10%)
Price: € 23,00 Score:
The wine shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, little transparency. The nose denotes intense, clean and elegant aromas such as black cherry jam, blackberry jam, plum and dried violet followed by caramel, white pepper, cocoa, walnut and vanilla. In mouth reveals good correspondence to the nose, a tannic attack well balanced by alcohol, intense flavors and full body. The finish is persistent with pleasing flavors of plum, blackberry jam and black cherry jam. This wine is aged for 12 months in steel tanks followed by 4-5 years of aging in cask.
Food Match: Roasted meat, Hard cheese, Game, Braised meat, Stewed meat



Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Marta Galli 1997, Le Ragose (Italy)
Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Marta Galli 1997
Le Ragose (Italy)
Grapes: Corvina (50%), Rondinella (20%), Cabernet (5%), other grapes (25%)
Price: € 28,50 Score:
The wine shows an intense ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, little transparency. The nose reveals personality with pleasing, clean, intense and elegant aromas, in particular of jams, such as black cherry jam, cherry jam, strawberry jam and blackberry jam followed by intense and clean aromas of black cherry macerated in alcohol, caramel, chocolate, plum, dried violet and vanilla. In mouth denotes good correspondence to the nose, a tannin attack well balanced by alcohol, intense flavors and full body. The finish is persistent with clean flavors of blackberry jam, cherry jam and plum. A very well made wine. This Amarone is aged for 3 months in steel tanks and for 2 years in cask followed by an aging in bottle for at least one year.
Food Match: Roasted meat, Hard cheese, Game, Braised meat, Stewed meat



Rosso Antonello 1999, Carlo Hauner (Italy)
Rosso Antonello 1999
Carlo Hauner (Italy)
Grapes: Calabrese, Sangiovese, Corinto Nero
Price: € 13,20 Score:
The wine shows a brilliant ruby red color and nuances of garnet red, moderate transparency. The nose reveals clean, intense and elegant aromas, mainly of fruit, such as black cherry, blueberry, blackberry, plum and carob followed by good aromas of dried rose, violet, cocoa and vanilla. In mouth had good correspondence to the nose, good balance, intense flavors and good body. The finish is persistent with pleasing and clean flavors of black cherry and plum. Rosso Antonello is aged in barrique followed by 9 months of aging in bottle.
Food Match: Roasted meat, Broiled meat and barbecue, Hard cheese, Braised meat



Malvasia delle Lipari Passito 2001, Carlo Hauner (Italy)
Malvasia delle Lipari Passito 2001
Carlo Hauner (Italy)
Grapes: Malvasia delle Lipari (95%), Corinto Nero (5%)
Price: € 18,00 (500ml - 16.9 fl.oz.Confectionery, Dried fruit tarts especially of almonds, Hard and piquant cheese Score:
Simply a great wine. It shows a beautiful and brilliant amber yellow color and nuances of golden yellow, very transparent. The nose reveals great personality with intense, elegant, refined, rich and pleasing aromas of apricot jam, peach jam, candied fruit, date, dried fig, dried flowers, almond, orange marmalade, honey, hazelnut, citrus fruit peel followed by a pleasing hint of rosemary. In mouth is rich and charming, adequate sweetness, smooth and round with intense flavors, very balanced. Excellent correspondence to the nose. The finish is very persistent with pleasing and long flavors of apricot, peach, honey, citrus fruit peel and candied fruit. A truly well made wine, extraordinary also when tasted alone. This Malvasia delle Lipari is produced with late harvested grapes which are subsequently dried on mats. The wine ages for 18 months and for 6 months in bottle.
Food Match: Confectionery, Dried fruit tarts especially of almonds, Hard and piquant cheese






 ABC Wine  Share this article     Summary of Wine Tasting column Wine Producers 
  Wine Tasting Issue 9, June 2003   
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